SCHEME OF EXAMINATION FOR MASTER OF COMPUTER APPLICATIONS w. e. f. Academic Session 2016-17(CHOICE BASED CREDIT SYSTEM ( CBCS))

 

Paper Code

Nomenclature of Paper

Credits

Exa

External

Internal

 

 

 

 

 

m

Marks

Marks

Total

 

 

 

 

Time

 

 

 

 

Marks

 

 

 

Max

Pass

Max

Pass

 

 

 

(hrs.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FIRST SEMESTER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-16-11

PROGRAMMING WITH C

4

3

75

30

25

10

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-16-12

COMPUTER ORGANIZATION &

4

3

75

30

25

10

100

 

ARCHITECTURE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-16-13

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

4

3

75

30

25

10

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-16-14

OPERATING SYSTEMS

4

3

75

30

25

10

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-16-15

WEB TECHNOLOGIES

4

3

75

30

25

10

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-16-16

S/W LAB – I BASED ON MCA-16-11

2.5

3

75

30

25

10

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-16-17

S/W LAB – II BASED ON MCA-16-15

2.5

3

75

30

25

10

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-16-18

SEMINAR

1

1/2

 

 

50

20

50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

26

 

525

 

225

 

750

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SECOND SEMESTER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-16-21

SYSTEM PROGRAMMING

4

3

75

30

25

10

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-16-22

OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING USING

4

3

75

30

25

10

100

 

C++

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-16-23

PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING

4

3

75

30

25

10

100

 

LANGUAGES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-16-24

DATA STRUCTURES

4

3

75

30

25

10

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-16-25

COMPUTER ORIENTED STATISTICAL

4

3

75

30

25

10

100

 

METHODS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-16-26

S/W LAB – III BASED ON MCA-16-22 & MCA-

2.5

3

75

30

25

10

100

 

16-24

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-16-27

S/W LAB – IV BASED ON MCA-16-25

2.5

3

75

30

25

10

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-16-28

SEMINAR

1

1/2

 

 

50

20

50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

26

 

525

 

225

 

750

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SCHEME OF EXAMINATION FOR MASTER OF COMPUTER APPLICATIONS (M.C.A.)

w.e.f. Academic Session 2017-18 (CHOICE BASED CREDIT SYSTEM (CBCS))

 

Paper Code

Nomenclature of Paper

Credits

Exam Time

(hrs.)

External Marks

Internal Marks

Total Marks

 

Max

Pass

Max

Pass

 

3rd Semester

 

MCA-16-31

DATABASE SYSTEMS

4

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-32

COMPUTER NETWORKS

4

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-33

JAVA PROGRAMMING

4

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-34

THEORY OF COMPUTATION

4

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-35

OBJECT ORIENTED ANALYSIS AND DESIGN USING UML

4

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-36

S/W LAB – V BASED ON MCA-16-31

2.5

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-37

S/W LAB – VI BASED ON MCA-16-33 & MCA-16-35

2.5

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-38

SEMINAR

1

1/2

 

 

50

50

20

 

OE

OPEN ELECTIVE (Students has to select a paper from other department(s) of Faculty of Sciences (Physical Sciences) of KUK)

2

3

35

14

15

50

20

 

 

TOTAL

28

 

560

224

240

800

320

 

4th Semester

 

MCA-16-41

DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS

4

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-42

COMPILER DESIGN

4

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-43

DATA WAREHOUSING AND MINING

4

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-44

COMPUTER GRAPHICS

4

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-45

LINUX AND SHELL PROGRAMMING

4

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-46

S/W LAB–VII BASED ON MCA-16-44

2.5

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-47

S/W LAB-VIII BASED ON MCA-16-45

2.5

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-48

SEMINAR

1

1/2

 

 

50

50

20

 

 

TOTAL

26

 

525

210

225

750

300

 

5th Semester w.e.f. Academic Session 2018-19 (CHOICE BASED CREDIT SYSTEM (CBCS))

 

MCA-16-51

ADVANCED WEB TECHNOLOGIES

4

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-52

HIGH PERFORMANCE NETWORKS

4

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-53

MOBILE APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT

4

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-54

ELECTIVE-I

4

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-55

ELECTIVE-II

4

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-56

S/W LAB–VII BASED ON MCA-16-51

2.5

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-57

S/W LAB-VIII BASED ON MCA-16-53

2.5

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-58

SEMINAR

1

1/2

 

 

50

50

20

 

 

TOTAL

26

 

525

210

225

750

300

 

ELECTIVE-I

I.                    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

II.                  SECURITY IN COMPUTING

III.               INFORMATION SYSTEMS

ELECTIVE-II

I.                    DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING

II.                  CLOUD COMPUTING

III.               OPERATIONAL RESEARCH

 

6th semester

 

MCA-16-61

ADVANCED JAVA TECHNOLOGIES

4

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-62

PYTHON PROGRAMMING

4

3

75

30

25

100

40

 

MCA-16-63

MINOR PROJECT

8

 

150

60

50

200

80

 

 

TOTAL

16

 

300

120

100

400

160

 

OR

 

MCA-16-66

MAJOR PROJECT

16

 

300

120

100

400

160

 

 

TOTAL

16

 

300

120

100

400

160

 

 

GRAND TOTAL

150

 

2995

 

1255

4250

1700

 

 

Note 1: Every student has to earn 2 credits by selecting an open elective paper from other department(s) of Faculty of Sciences (Physical Sciences) of KUK during second semester (OE-201 to OE-209).

Note 2: Total Credits for the First Year will be 54 (26+26+2).

 

Note 3: Sessional Marks in each theory paper will be awarded by the concerned teacher on the basis of marks obtained in one class test (of 15 Marks and 90 minutes’ duration) and evaluation of assignments (of 10 Marks).

 

Note 4: Sessional Marks in each practical paper will be awarded by the concerned teacher on the basis of marks obtained in one practical exam (of 15 Marks and 90 minutes’ duration) and viva-voce (of 10 Marks).

 

Note 5: Size of Groups for all practicals should not be more than thirty students.


MCA-16–11                    PROGRAMMING WITH C

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 75, Internal: 25)                                 Time: 3 hours

CREDITS: 4

 

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

Objectives:

 

The objective of this course is to provide the fundamental and in-depth coverage of programming aspects and implementation in C language.

 

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this course students should be able to:

·        Implement the algorithms in C language.

 

·        Use different constructs of C language to help in implementation.

 

·        Understand the static and dynamic use of memory.

 

UNIT – I

 

Overview of C: Structure & Memory Layout of C Program; Elements of C, Data types; Storage classes in C: auto, extern, register and static storage class; Header files: Using pre-defined and user-defined header files, Operators: Arithmetic, relational, logical, bitwise, unary, assignment and conditional operators, side effects, precedence & associativity of operators.

 

UNIT – II

Input/Output: Unformatted & formatted I/O function in C, low-level DOS character I/O.

 

Control statements: Sequencing, Selection: if statement, switch statement; Repetition: for, while, and do-while loop; break, continue, goto statements.

 

Functions: Definition, prototype, parameters passing techniques, recursion, built-in functions.

 

UNIT – III

 

Arrays: Definition, types, initialization, processing an array, passing arrays to functions, returning arrays from functions, String handling.

 

Pointers: Declaration, operations on pointers, pointers and arrays, dynamic memory allocation, pointers and functions, pointers and strings, void pointer.

 

UNIT – IV

 

Structure & Union: Definition, processing, Structure and pointers, passing structures to functions, use of union. Data files: Opening and closing a file, I/O operations on files, Error handling during I/O operation, Random access to files, Text file and Binary files. Pre-processor commands and Macro definitions.

 

Text Books:

 

1.  Forouzan Behrouz, “Computer Science: A Structured Programming Approach Using C”, 1st Ed., Cengage Learning

 

2.  Balagurusamy E., “Programming in ANSI C”, 6th Ed., Tata McGraw-Hill.

 

Reference Books:

1.  Gottfried, Byron S., “Programming with C”, 2nd Ed., Tata McGraw Hill.

2.  Jeri R. Hanly & Elliot P. Koffman, “Problem Solving and Program Design in C”, 7th Ed., Pearson Education.

3. Yashwant Kanetker, “Let us C”, 13th Ed., BPB Publications.

 

4.  Rajaraman, V., “Computer Programming in C”, 3rd Ed., PHI Learning, India.


MCA-16–12                   COMPUTER ORGANIZATION & ARCHITECTURE

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 75, Internal: 25)                 Time: 3 hours                 CREDITS: 4

 

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

Objectives

 

The objective of this course is to provide concepts of computer architecture and organization, and understand the key skills of constructing cost-effective computer systems. It focusses on design issues in the development of basic computer or components that satisfy design requirements.

 

Learning Outcomes

 

At the end of this course students should be able to:

 

·         Design combinational and sequential circuits.

 

·         Understand the basic structure and operation of a digital computer.

 

·         Understand the operation of the arithmetic unit including the algorithms & implementation of fixed-point and floating-point addition, subtraction, multiplication & division.

 

·         Know the different ways of communicating with I/O devices and standard I/O interfaces.

·         Understand the hierarchical memory system including cache memories and virtual memory.

 

UNIT – I

 

Digital Logic Fundamentals: Boolean algebra–basic functions, manipulating Boolean functions, K-maps and Quine McCluskey procedures. Combination Logic–multiplexers, decoders, encoders, comparators, adders & subtractors, BCD-to-Seven segment decoder. Basic Sequential Circuits–Flip-flops (RS, JK, T-type and D-Type), Ripple counter, Shift Register.

 

UNIT – II

 

Basic Computer Organization: Generic computer organization – system bus, instruction cycle, timing diagram of memory read and write operations, CPU organization, memory subsystem organization and interfacing – types of memory, chip organization, memory subsystem configuration, multi-byte data organization, I/O subsystem organization and interfacing, memory subsystem configuration.

Register Transfer Language (RTL): different types of micro-operations, using RTL to specify digital systems

 

– specification of digital components, simple systems, Modulo-6 counter.

 

UNIT – III

 

CPU Design: design and implementation of simple CPU-fetching, decoding & executing instruction, establishing required data paths, designing hardwired control unit.

 

Microsequencer Control Unit Design: microsequencer operations, microinstruction formats, design and implementation of a simple microsequencer, reducing number of microinstructions.

 

Computer Arithmetic: Hardware implementation of unsigned & signed (addition & subtraction, multiplication, booth’s algorithm, division). Floating-point numbers (IEEE 754 standard) – addition, subtraction, multiplication, division.

 

UNIT – IV

 

Memory Organization: Hierarchical memory system, associative memory, cache memory – associative, direct and set associative mappings, replacing & writing data in cache, cache performance, virtual memory - paging, segmentation, memory protection.

 

I/O Organization: Asynchronous data transfer - source and destination - initiated, handshaking, programmed I/O, interrupts, DMA, IOP, serial communication–UART, RS-232C standard, USB standard.

 

Text Books:

1.      John D. Carpinelli, “Computer Systems Organization & Architecture”, 1st Ed., Pearson Education, 2001.

2.      Stallings W., “Computer Organization and Architecture”, 9th Ed., Pearson Education, 2014.

Reference Books:

 

1.   Rajaraman, V., Radhakrishanan, T. “An Introduction to Digital Computer Design”, 5th Ed., PHI Learning.

 

2.   Mano, M. Morris “Digital Logic and Computer Design”, 5th Ed., Pearson Education.

 

3.   Tanenbaum A.S., Todd Austin, “Structured Computer Organization”, 6th Ed., PHI Learning.

 

4.   Carl Hamacher, Zvonko Vranesic, Safwat Zaky, “Computer Organization”, 5th Ed., Tata McGraw Hill.


MCA-16–13 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING Maximum marks: 100 (External: 75, Internal: 25) Time: 3 hours CREDITS: 4

 

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

Objectives:

 

The objective of this course is to educate the students about (i) the different models of software development, (ii) metrics used in software engineering and (iii) different quality standards.

 

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this course students should be able to:

 

·         Apply the different tools and techniques to the software development.

 

·         Quantitatively evaluate the process and product.

 

Unit- I

 

Introduction to Software Engineering, System Engineering Vs Software Engineering, Software Evolution, Software Characteristics, Components, Crisis–Problems and Causes, Software Feasibility, Software Process Models – V-Model, Waterfall, Iterative Enhancement, Incremental, RAD, Prototyping, Spiral, Concurrent Development, Rational Unified Process & AGILE. Challenges in Software Engineering. Software Quality Standards: ISO 9001, SEI-CMM, CMMI.

 

Unit – II

 

Software Project Management – Planning, Scope Management, Cost Estimation – LOC, Function Point Analysis & COCOMO, Putnam Resource Allocation Model, Project Scheduling & Resource Management Gantt-Chart, PERT Chart, Histogram, Critical Path Analysis, Team Building and Organization Charts, Project Monitoring & Risk Management, Software Configuration Management, Software Quality Assurance, Project Monitoring& Techniques.

 

Software Requirement Analysis - Structured Analysis, Object Oriented Analysis and Data Modelling, Software Requirement Specification, DFDs, Data Dictionaries, Decision Trees, Decision Tables & Structured English, ER Diagrams.

 

Unit-III

 

Design and Implementation of Software – Basic Fundamentals, Design Methodology (Structured and Object Oriented), Design Approaches, UML & Design Patterns, User Interface Designing Tools & Techniques, Design Complexity, Monitoring and Control, Coding, Halstead’s Software Science, McCabe’s Cyclomatic Complexity

 

Software Reliability: Metric and Specification, Fault Avoidance and Tolerance, Exception Handling, Defensive Programming, Component Based Development.

 

Unit-IV

 

Software Testing – Fundamentals, Validation & Verification, White-Box and Black-Box Testing Techniques (Control Flow, Data Flow, Loop, Mutation, Load, Stress, Performance, Boundary Value, Equivalence Class, Decision Table, Cause Effect Graph Testing) Testing Strategies: Unit, Integration, Validation and System Testing, Alpha & Beta Testing, Debugging, Static Testing Strategies.

 

Software Re-engineering &Maintenance – Re-Engineering & Reverse Engineering, Maintenance Characteristics, Maintainability, Maintenance Tasks and Side Effects. CASE Tools.

 

Text Books:

 

1.  Pressman S. Roger, “Software Engineering”, 7th Ed., Tata McGraw Hill.

 

2.  Jalote Pankaj, “An Integrated Approach to Software Engineering”, 2nd Ed., Narosa Publ. House.

 

Reference Books:

 

1.  K. K. Aggarwal, Yogesh Singh, “Software Engineering”, 3rd Ed., New Age International.

2.  Sommerville, “Software Engineering”, 5th edition, Pearson Education.

 

3.  Fairley Richard, “Software Engineering Concepts”, Tata Mc-Graw Hill Ed.

 

4.  Rajib Mall, “Fundamentals of Software Engineering”, 3rd Ed., PHI Learning.


MCA-16–14                    OPERATING SYSTEMS

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 75, Internal: 25)                 Time: 3 hours                 CREDITS: 4

 

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

Objectives:

 

The objective of this paper is to get the students familiar with different functions performed by operating systems.

 

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this course students should be able to:

·         Understand the concept of Operating System.

·         Understand the concept of process, file, memory and device management.

·         Appreciate the need of distributed operating systems and their working.

 

UNIT – I

 

Introductory Concepts: Operating system functions, structure, types viz. distributed systems, special-purpose systems, open-source operating systems; Operating system services, system calls, system programs.

 

CPU Scheduling: Process concepts, process operations, inter-process communication, scheduling criteria, scheduling algorithms, Comparative study of scheduling algorithms, Multiple processor scheduling.

 

UNIT – II

 

Concurrent Processes: Critical section problem, Semaphores, Classical process co-ordination problems and their solutions, monitors, synchronization examples.

 

Deadlocks: Deadlock characterization, Deadlock prevention and avoidance, Deadlock detection and recovery.

 

UNIT – III

 

Memory Management: Swapping, Paging, Segmentation, Virtual memory concepts: Demand Paging, Page replacement Algorithms, Thrashing.

 

Storage Management: File concepts, File access and allocation methods, File-system mounting, sharing, protection, structure and implementation. Directory Systems: Structured Organizations, directory protection mechanisms, recovery. Disk scheduling.

 

UNIT – IV

 

Protection & Security: Goals & principles of protection, domains of protection, access matrix, access controls. Security: Security problem, threats, security tools, classification.

 

Distributed Systems: Types of network-based OS, Network structure and topologies, Communication structure & Protocol, design issues. Distributed File-system: Remote file access, File replication. Distributed synchronization: Mutual exclusion, Concurrency control, deadlock handling.

 

Text Books:

1.  Silberschatz A., Galvin P. B., Gagne G., “Operating System Concepts”, 10th Ed., Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.

2.  Godbole, A.S., “Operating Systems”, Tata McGraw-Hill, 2nd Ed., New Delhi.

 

3. Tanenbaum, A.S., “Operating System- Design and Implementation”, 3rd Ed., PHI Learning.

 

Reference Books:

1.      Deitel, H.M., “Operating Systems”, 3rd Ed., Pearson Education.

2.      Stallings William, “Operating System”, 8th Ed., PHI Learning.


MCA-16–15                    WEB TECHNOLOGIES

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 75, Internal: 25)                 Time: 3 hours                 CREDITS: 4

 

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

Objectives:

 

The objective of this course is to provide the fundamental and in-depth coverage of technologies used in the design and development of web based applications such as HTML/CSS/JavaScript/PHP for client-side and server-side programming.

 

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this course students should be able to:

·         Design web sites for various requirements.

 

·         Design web applications with CSS.

 

·         Develop web based applications by programming on both sides (client and server).

 

UNIT – I

 

Introduction to Web Engineering: Categories and Characteristics of Web Applications, Web Applications Vs Conventional Software, Need for an Engineering Approach.

 

Web Essentials: The Internet, Basic Internet Protocols, WWW, HTTP (Structure of Request and Response Messages), Web Browser and its functions, URL, Web Servers and their features, Defining Virtual Hosts, Secure Servers.

 

UNIT – II

 

MarkUp Languages: Introduction to HTML, Characteristics, XHTML Syntax and Semantics, Fundamental HTML Elements, Lists, Tables, Frames, Forms, XHTML Abstract Syntax, Creating HTML Pages. Cascading Style Sheets: Features, Core Syntax, Types, Style Sheets and HTML, Style Rule Cascading and Inheritance, Text Properties, CSS Box Model, Normal Flow Box Layout, Positioning and other useful Style Properties.

 

UNIT – III

 

Client–Side Programming (JavaScript): Introduction, obtaining user inputs, memory concepts, Operators, Control Structures, looping constructs, break, continue statements, Programmer defined functions, Scoping rules, Recursion and iteration, Array declaration and allocation, passing arrays to function, Objects: String, Date, Boolean, Window, document; using cookies, Handling Events Using JavaScript, data validation using regular expressions.

 

UNIT – IV

 

Server-Side Programming (PHP): PHP, Installing and Configuring MySQL and PHP, Basic Security Guidelines, Variables, Data Types, Operators and Expressions, Constants, Flow Control Functions; Switching Flow, Loops, Code Blocks and Browser Output, Objects, Strings Processing, Form processing, Connecting to database, cookies and session management, dynamic contents.

 

Text Books:

1.      Deitel H.M., Deitel P.J., “Internet & World wide Web: How to program”, 4th Ed., Pearson Education.

2.      Kogent Learning, “Web Technologies: HTML, JavaScript, PHP, Java, JSP, XML, AJAX – Black Book”, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.

 

Reference Books:

1.      Jeffrey C. Jackson, “Web Technologies”, 1st Ed., Pearson Education, India.

2.      Thomas Powell, “The Complete Reference HTML”, 5th Ed., Tata McGraw Hill, India.

3.      William Pardi, “XML in Action”, 1st Ed., IT Professional, New York, USA.


MCA-16–18                    SEMINAR

 

Maximum marks: 50                                                Time: 1/2 hours                             CREDITS: 1

 

Seminar

 

Each student shall individually prepare and submit a seminar report within stipulated time. A panel consisting of two teachers (internal) should evaluate the seminar report and the presentation. Marks should be distributed considering report writing, presentation, technical content, depth of knowledge, brevity and references and their participation in seminar. The time allotted for presentation is 30 minutes.


MCA-16–21                    SYSTEM PROGRAMMING

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 75, Internal: 25)                 Time: 3 hours                 CREDITS: 4

 

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

Objectives:

 

The objective of this course is to provide the fundamental and in-depth coverage of system programming concepts like assemblers, linkers, loaders, compiler etc.

 

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this course students should be able to:

·         Understand the basics of stems.

·         Understand various kind language processors.

·         Understand various compiling and linking steps.

 

UNIT – I

 

System Software: Definition, Goals of System Software, Program Development and Production Environments, Software Portability, Programs as components, Quick and Dirty Programming, User-Centric and System-Centric view of System Software.

 

Language Processors: Types of Language Processors, Program Generation, Program Execution, Program Translation and Interpretation, Fundamentals of Language Processing, Symbol Tables.

 

UNIT – II

 

Assemblers: Elements of Assembly Language Programming, Pass Structure of Assemblers, Design of Two-pass assembler, Intermediate code forms, Program Listing and Error reporting, Organizational and Design issues in assemblers.

 

Macros and Macro Pre-processors: Macro Definition and Call, Macro expansion, Nested Macro calls, Design of a Macro pre-processor, Processing of Macro definitions, Use of Stack in expansion of macro calls, Design of a macro assembler

 

UNIT – III

 

Linkers and Loaders: Linking & Relocation, Design of a Linker, Self-Relocating, Dynamic Linking, Linking for program overlays, Loaders, Absolute and Relocating loaders.

 

Scanning and Parsing: Chomsky hierarchy of formal languages, Ambiguous grammars, Scanning, Parsing: Top-down and Bottom-up Parsing.

 

UNIT – IV

 

Compilers and Interpreters: Binding and Binding times, Data Structures of compilers, Scoping rules, Memory allocation, Static and dynamic memory allocation and deallocation, Recursion, Compilation of expressions, Postfix notations, Expression trees, Compilation of Control structures, Code Optimization, Local and Global optimization, Overview and benefits of interpretation, Pure and impure interpreters.

 

Text books:

1.        Dhamdhere D.M, “System programming”, 2nd Ed., Tata McGraw-Hill.

2.        Beck L. Leland, “System Software”, 3rd Ed., Pearson Education.

 

Reference Books:

1.        Aho, Sethi, & Ullman, “Compilers Principles, Techniques and Tools”, 2nd Ed., Pearson Education.

2.        Donovan J. John, “System Programming”, Tata McGraw Hill.


MCA-16–22    OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING USING C++

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 75, Internal: 25)                 Time: 3 hours                 CREDITS: 4

 

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

Objectives:

 

The objective of this course is to provide the fundamental and in-depth coverage of object oriented programming. It also focuses on implementation of object-oriented paradigms in C++.

 

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this course students should be able to:

·         Make the object oriented scenario for a real life problem.

·         Know various kind of object-oriented features.

·         Implement the programming aspects in C++.

 

UNIT - I

 

Introduction: Object-Oriented features of C++, Comparison of C with C++, Class and Objects, Inline functions, Static data members and member functions, Read-Only objects, Pointers, Dynamic memory allocation and deallocation, constructors and destructors, Dynamic objects, array of pointers to object, local and global class, nested and empty class, pre-processor directives, Header files and namespaces. Console I/O: Hierarchy of console stream classes, unformatted and formatted I/O operations, Manipulators.

 

UNIT - II

 

Compile-time Polymorphism: Operator Overloading-overloading unary and binary arithmetic and relational operators, overloading subscript, insertion, extraction, new and delete operators; function overloading Friend Function and Friend Class: Friend function, overloading operators by friend function, friend class Type Conversion: Basic type conversion, conversion between Objects and Basic Types, conversion between objects of different classes.

 

UNIT - III

 

Inheritance: Base and Derived Classes, Protected Members, Casting Base-Class Pointers to Derived-Class Pointers, Using Member Functions, Overriding Base–Class Members in a Derived Class, Public, Protected and Private Inheritance, Using Constructors and Destructors in derived Classes, Implicit Derived–Class Object to Base-Class Object Conversion, Composition Vs. Inheritance.

 

Virtual Functions & Derivations: Virtual functions and their needs, Pure virtual function, virtual destructor, virtual derivation, abstract class.

 

UNIT - IV

 

Generic Programming: Function Templates, Overloading Template Functions, Class Template, Class Templates and Non-Type Parameters.

 

Exception Handling: Try, Throw, Catch, throwing an Exception, catching an Exception, Re-throwing an Exception.

 

File Handling: Hierarchy of File Stream classes, Opening and Closing files, File modes, testing for errors, File pointers and their manipulations, ASCII & Binary files, Sequential and Random access files.

 

Text Books:

1.        Bjarne Stroustrup, “The C++ Programming Language”, 4th Ed., Pearson Education.

2.        Forouzan, Gilberg, “Computer Science: A Structured Programming Approach Using C++”, Cengage Learning.

 

Reference Books:

1.        Herbert Shildt, “C++: The Complete Reference”, 4th Ed., Tata McGraw-Hill.

2.        Balaguruswami, E., “Object Oriented Programming in C++”, 2nd Ed., Tata McGraw-Hill.

 

3.        Robert Lafore, “Object Oriented Programming in C++”, 4th Ed., Techmedia SAMS.

 

4.        Bhave M.P., Patekar S.A., “Object Oriented Programming with C++”, 2nd Ed., Pearson Education.


MCA-16–23                   PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 75, Internal: 25)                 Time: 3 hours                 CREDITS: 4

 

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

Objectives:

 

The objective of this paper is to make the students familiar with different elements of programming languages such as data types/operators/statements/control constructs and their implementation with the understanding that it will help them in becoming a better programmer.

 

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this course students should be able to:

·         Understand the programming language hierarchy.

 

·         Understand various programming paradigms.

 

·         Understand the semantics of different language constructs.

 

UNIT – I

 

Preliminaries: History, Impact of Programming Paradigms, Role of Programming Languages, Good Language, Effects of Programming Environment, Translators and virtual architectures, Binding and Binding time, Language Syntax, Analysis of Program, Synthesis of Object program, Formal translation models: BNF Grammars, General parsing, Language translation, Recursive descent parsing.

 

UNIT – II

 

Formal languages and automata: The Chomsky hierarchy of formal languages, regular grammars, Regular expressions, Finite State Automata, Context-free grammars, Pushdown automata, Ambiguous grammars. Language Semantics: Attribute grammars, Denotational semantics, Program verification and validation, Data objects, variables, constants, data types, declaration, type checking, type casting, type promotion, Enumerators, Composite data types.

 

UNIT – III

 

Object Orientated concepts: Structured data types, Abstract data types, Information hiding, Subprogram concepts, Good program design, Type definitions, Type equivalence, Inheritance, Derived classes, Abstract classes, Polymorphism, Inheritance and software reuse.

 

Sequence control: Implicit and explicit sequence control, Sequence control within arithmetic expressions, sequence control between statements, sequencing with non-arithmetic expressions, Subprogram Sequence control.

 

UNIT – IV

 

Miscellaneous topics: Parameter passing techniques, Static & Dynamic Scoping, Storage of variables, Static storage, Heap Storage management, Distributed Processing, Exceptions and Exception handlers, Co-routines, Scheduled subprograms, Parallel programming, Processor design, Hardware and Software architectures, Network Programming, Evolution of scripting languages, Applets, XML.

 

Text Books:

1.      Pratt T.W., Zelkowitz M.V., Gopal T.V., “Programming Languages Design and Implementation”, 4th Ed., Pearson Education.

 

2.      Sebesta W. Robert, “Concepts of Programming Languages”, 11th Ed., Pearson Education.

 

Reference Books:

 

1.      Appleby Doris & Vande Kopple J. Julius, “Programming Languages-Paradigm and practice”, 2nd Ed., Tata McGraw Hill.

 

2.      Sethi Ravi, “Programming Languages: Concepts & Constructs”, 2nd Ed., Pearson Education

 

3.      Scott M., “Programming Language Pragmatics”, 4th Ed., Elsevier India.


MCA-16–24                    DATA STRUCTURES

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 75, Internal: 25)                 Time: 3 hours                 CREDITS: 4

 

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

Objectives:

 

The objective of this paper is to make the students familiar with the commonly used data structures and understand their applications in real life problems.

 

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this course students should be able to:

·         Design various kind of data structures.

·         Design the data structures according to the need of problem in hand.

·         Understand various fundamental and advanced data structures.

 

UNIT – I

 

Introduction to Data Structures: Classification of Data Structures, Complexity of Algorithms, Asymptotic Notations, Abstract Data Types, Arrays, Representation of Arrays in memory, Operations on Array, Strings, Pointers, Sparse Matrices, Applications.

 

UNIT – II

 

Stacks & Queues: Representation of Stacks, Stack Operations, Applications, Queues, Operations on Queues, Circular Queues, Dequeue, Priority Queues, Applications.

 

Linked Lists: Introduction, Types, Operations (Insertion, Deletion, Traversal, Searching, Sorting), Applications, Dynamic Memory Management, Implementation of Linked Representations.

 

UNIT – III

 

Trees: Definition and Basic Terminologies, Representation of Trees, Binary Trees, Types of Tree, Representation of Binary Trees, Binary Tree Traversals, Threaded Binary Trees, Binary Search Trees and Operations, Minimum Spanning Tree, AVL Trees, Heap, m-way Search Trees, B-Trees, B+ Trees, Applications.

UNIT – IV

 

Graphs: Definitions and Basic Terminologies, Representation of Graphs, Graph Traversals, Shortest Path Problem, Applications.

 

Sorting and Searching: Recursive Binary Search, Types of Sorting, Implementation of Different Sorting Techniques: Selection Sort, Insertion Sort, Merge Sort, Radix Sort.

Hashing & Collision handling.

 

Text Books:

1.    G.A.V Pai, “Data Structures and Algorithms”, 2nd Ed., Tata McGraw-Hill.

2.    Drozdek, “Data Structure and Algorithms in C++”, 3rd Ed., Cengage Learning.

 

Reference Books:

 

1.    Trembley, J.P. And Sorenson P.G., “An Introduction to Data Structures with Applications”, 2nd Ed., Tata McGraw- Hill.

 

2.    Seymour Lipschutz, “Data Structures”, Revised 1st Ed., Tata McGraw-Hill, Schaum’s Outlines, New Delhi.

 

3.    Weiss, “Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C++”, 4th Ed., Pearson Education.

 

4.    Goodrich, “Data Structures & Algorithms in C++”, 2nd Ed., Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.


MCA-16–25                   COMPUTER ORIENTED STATISTICAL METHODS

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 75, Internal: 25)                 Time: 3 hours                 CREDITS: 4

 

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

Objectives:

 

The objective of this paper is to get the students acquainted with the statistical techniques required generally for analysis of the data and implementing those statistical methods in R language.

 

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this course students should be able to:

·         Understand the basics of computer oriented statistics.

·         Understand various kind of distributions in statistics.

·         Understand the hypothesis and significance of hypothesis.

·         Implement the statistics in R language.

 

UNIT – I

 

R Language: Introduction, Objects, Data types, Operators, workspace, Looping in R, functions and packages, Handling data with R, Graphics with R, Statistical analyses with R: Generic functions, packages; Parametric and non-parametric tests with R.

 

UNIT – II

 

Statistics: Introduction, Origin & Development, Definition, Importance, Limitations; Frequency distributions: Graphical Representation; measures of central tendency, arithmetic mean, geometric mean, harmonic mean, weighted mean, median, mode; Measures of Dispersion, Skewness, Kurtosis

 

Probability: Introduction, types, Sample space, Event, Mathematical Notation, Laws of probability, types of events, Bayes Theorem.

 

UNIT – III

 

Random Variables & it types, Distribution functions & its types, Probability Density function, Mathematical Expectation, Moment Generating Function.

Theoretical Discrete Distributions: Binomial, Poisson, Geometric, Uniform.

Theoretical Continuous Distribution: Normal, Gamma, Beta, Central Limit Theorem, Crammer's Theorem

 

UNIT – IV

Curve fitting & Principles of Least Squares, Correlation: Karl Pearson, Rank; Regression.

 

Sampling: Introduction, types, parameter and statistic, Standard Error, Tests of Significance, Hypothesis, Critical Region and Level of significance.

Sampling Distributions: Chi-Square Distribution, T Distribution, F Distribution, Z Distribution; ANOVA

 

Text Books:

1.      Gupta S. C., Kapoor V. K., “Fundamentals of Mathematical Statistics”, 11th Ed., Sultan Chand & Sons.

2.      Gardener M., “Beginning R: The Statistical Programming Language”, 1st Ed., Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.

 

Reference Books:

1.      Lander J.P. “R for Everyone”, 1st Ed., Pearson Education.

2.      Gupta S. C., Kapoor V. K., “Fundamentals of Applied Statistics”, 11th Ed., Sultan Chand & Sons.

 

3.      S.P.Gupta, “Statistical Methods”, 28th Ed., Sultan Chand & Sons.


MCA-16–28                    SEMINAR

 

Maximum marks: 50                                                Time: 1/2 hours                             CREDITS: 1

 

Seminar

 

Each student shall individually prepare and submit a seminar report within stipulated time. A panel consisting of two teachers (internal) should evaluate the seminar report and the presentation. Marks should be distributed considering report writing, presentation, technical content, depth of knowledge, brevity and references and their participation in seminar. The time allotted for presentation is 30 minutes.

 

 

 

MCA-16-31                 DATABASE SYSTEMS

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 75, Internal: 25)               Time: 3 hours             Credits: 4

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all.  Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

Objectives: The objective of the course is to provide fundamental concepts necessary for designing, using and implementing database systems and database applications; these concepts includes aspects of database modeling & design, database languages, database management systems and database systems implementation techniques. Using these concepts students will be ready for job assignments on database systems and to undertake projects on database design and implementation.

Learning Outcomes:  At the end of course the students should be able:

l  To understand overall process of database modeling & design, Implementation

l  To work on assignments on database modeling & design

l  To undertake various projects on database applications

UNIT – I

Basic Concepts: File Systems vs. DMBS, Characteristics of the Database Approach, Abstraction and Data Integration, Database users, Advantages and Disadvantages of a DBMS.

Database Systems Concepts and Architecture: Data Models, Schema and Instances, DBMS architecture and Data Independence, Database languages and Interfaces, DBMS functions and component modules.

Entity Relationship Model: Entity Types, Entity Sets, Attributes & keys, Relationships Types & instances, Roles and Structural Constraints, E-R Diagrams, Design of an E-R Database Schema, Reduction of an E-R schema to Tables.

Relational Data Model: Relational Model Concepts, Integrity Constraints over Relations, Relational Algebra – Basic Operations.

UNIT – II

SQL: Data Definition and Data Types, DDL, DML, and DCL, Views & Queries in SQL, Specifying Constraints & Indexes in SQL.

Relational Database Management System: ORACLE-Basic structure, Database Structure & its manipulation in ORACLE, Storage Organization in ORACLE, Programming ORACLE Applications.

Conventional Data Models: An overview of Network and Hierarchical Data Models.

UNIT – III

Relational Database Design: Functional Dependencies, Decomposition, Normal forms based on primary keys- (1NF, 2NF, 3NF, BCNF), Multi-valued Dependencies,4 NF, Join dependencies,5 NF, Domain Key Normal form.

Practical Database Design:   Role of Information systems in Organizations, Database design process, Physical database design in Relational Database.

UNIT – IV

Transaction Processing Concepts:   Introduction to Transaction Processing, Transaction & System Concepts, Properties of Transaction, Schedules and Recoverability, Serializability of Schedules.

Concurrency Control Techniques: Locking Techniques, Timestamp ordering, Multi-version Techniques, Optimistic Techniques, Granularity of Data items.

Recovery Techniques: Recovery concepts, Recovery Techniques in centralized DBMS.

Database Security: Introduction to Database Security issues.

 

Text Books:

3.         Elmasri & Navathe: Fundamentals of Database systems, 7th edition, Pearson Education.

4.         Thomas Connolly Carolyn Begg: Database Systems, 3/e, Pearson Education.

Reference Books:

5.         Korth & Silberschatz: Database System Concept, 6th Edition, McGraw Hill International Edition.

6.         Raghu Ramakrishnan & Johannes Gehrke: Database Management Systems, 3rd edition, Mcgraw Hill.

7.         Peter Rob, Carlos Colonel: Database system Design, Implementation, and Measurement, Cengage         Learning,        8th  Ed.

8.         Abbey, Abramson & Corey: Oracle 8i-A Beginner’s Guide, Tata McGraw Hill.

9.         Ivan Bayross: SQL, PL/SQL- The Program Language of ORACLE,4th Edition BPB Publication.

MCA-16-32                COMPUTER NETWORKS

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 75, Internal: 25)               Time: 3 hours             Credits: 4

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all.  Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

Objectives: The objective of this course is to provide the in-depth coverage of various concepts of computer networks. Using these concepts students will be able to understand the networking environment in real-world.

 

Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course students should be able to:

l  Understand various uses and types of computer networks.

l  Understand the concepts of data communication.

l  Understand the various issues in protocols design.

 

UNIT – I

Introduction to Computer Networks and its uses; Network categorization and Hardware; Topologies; Network Software: Protocols, Services, Network Architecture, Design issues for the layers, OSI Reference model, TCP/IP Reference model, Comparison of OSI and TCP/IP Models. Introduction to Example Networks: Internet, ISDN, X.25, Frame Relay, ATM.

UNIT – II

Data Communication Model, Digital and Analog data and signals, Asynchronous and Synchronous transmission; bit rate, baud, bandwidth, Transmission impairment; Channel Capacity; Guided Transmission Media; Wireless transmission; Satellite communication.

Switching; Multiplexing; Spread Spectrum; local loop; Modems and ADSL; Encoding:  NRZ, NRZ-I, Manchester and Differential Manchester encoding; Internet over Cable; ADSL Versus Cable; The Mobile Telephone System;

UNIT – III

Data Link Layer Design issues; Framing,  Error Detection and Correction; Flow Control: Sliding Window Protocols; Medium Access Control: Aloha, CSMA protocols, Collision free protocols, Limited Contention Protocols; Wavelength Division Multiple access protocol, Wireless LAN Protocol: MACA; High Speed LANs; Ethernet LAN, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet;  Binary Exponential Backoff algorithm; Token Ring and FDDI;  Introduction to Wireless LANs;

UNIT – IV

Network Layer Design issues , Virtual Circuit and Datagram Subnet, Routing Algorithms: Optimality principle, Shortest path Routing, Flooding , Distance Vector Routing, Link State Routing, Hierarchical Routing, Broadcast and Multi Cast Routing, Routing for Mobile hosts,  Congestion Control Algorithms: General Principals; Congestion control in Virtual – Circuit Subnets; Congestion Control in Datagram Subnets: Choke packets, Load Shedding; Random Early Detection, Jitter Control; Quality of Service: Over provisioning, Buffering, Traffic Shaping, Leaky bucket, token bucket, Resource Reservation, Admission Control, Packet Scheduling;

 

Text Books:

5.      Andrew S. Tanenbaum, Computer Networks, 4th Edition - PHI.

6.      Behrouz A Forouzan, Data   Communications   and   Networking, 5th Edition- Tata Mc-Graw Hill. 

 

Reference Books:

3.      Michael A. Gallo, William M. Hancock, Computer Communications and Networking Technologies – 

     CENGAGE learning.

4.      William Stallings, Data and Computer Communications, 5th Edition – PHI.

MCA-16-33                 PROGRAMMING IN JAVA

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 75, Internal: 25)               Time: 3 hours             Credits: 4

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all.  Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

Objectives: The objective of this course is to provide the detailed coverage of various concepts of JAVA programming language. It prepares the students for the software-industry as Java is one of the most popular languages in software-industry.

 

Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course students should be able to:

l  Understand the basic concepts of Java.

l  Understand and use the concepts of multithreading and exception handling.

l  Use the applet programming and streams.

l  Understand and use the event based programming.

UNIT – I

Java History: Java features, How Java differs from C++, Java Program Structure, Java Tokens, , Java virtual machine, Constants, variables and data types, operators & expressions, control structures, arrays, class & object, garbage collection , finalize () method, Inheritance, method overriding, Abstract class,  Multiple inheritance, Interfaces, extending Interfaces, Accessing Interface variables.

 

UNIT – II

Packages, Exception Handling & Multithreading: API Packages, Creating packages, Accessing a package, Adding a class to a package, use of super and final keywords, Wrapper classes, Exception types, uncaught exceptions, multiple catch clauses, nested try statements, built-in exceptions, creating your own exceptions, Multithreading; Java thread model, thread priorities, threads synchronization, thread suspending, resuming and stopping threads.

 

UNIT – III

I/O Streams & Applet: Console I/O – reading console input, writing console output, Files I/O-Byte Streams, Character Streams, Collection of inbuilt Interfaces & Classes, Applet programming, Applet life Cycle, creating executable Applet, Applet Tag, Running an applet, passing parameters to applet, Graphics programming, GUI Concepts in Java, managing Input/Output in Applet.

 

UNIT – IV

Event Handling: AWT Classes, AWT Button, AWT Label, AWT TextField, AWT TextArea, AWT Checkbox, Event Listeners, Java ActionListener, Java MouseListener, MouseMotionListener, Adapter Classes as Helper Classes in Event Handling. Layout managers- Grid Layout, Flow Layout, Card Layout, Border Layout, Menus.

 

Text Books:-

1. Herbert Schildt, “JAVA: The Complete Reference”, Tata Mc-Graw Hill

2. The Complete reference Java 2, 9th Edi. By Patrick Naughton, Herbert, Schild Tata Mc-Graw Hill

 

Reference Books:-

1. Exploring Java: Patrick Nieaneyer and Joshna Peck O, Reilley S Associates, Inc.

2. Programming with JAVA, A Primer. E. Balaguruswamy Publisher: Tata Mc-Graw Hill publication.

3. Hareliy Hahn Teacher the Internets, 1999 By Harley Hahn, P.H.I.

4. Java 2 exam Guide: Barry Boone / William Stanck Tata Mc-Graw Hill.

MCA-16-34                 THEORY OF COMPUTATION

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 75, Internal: 25)               Time: 3 hours             Credits: 4

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

Objectives: The objective of this course is to provide the in-depth coverage of theoretical computer science. It provides an insight about design of all types machines and their applications.

 

Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course students should be able to:

l  Design various finite state machines for real life problems.

l  Differentiate between the applications of different kind of machines

l  Solve the tractable and intractable problems using various approaches.

l  Understand the need and importance of Turing machines and their suitability.

 

UNIT– I

Finite State Machines: Finite Automata, Designing of DFA and NDFA, NFA with E-Transitions, Equivalence of DFA and NFA with proof, Regular Expressions and Regular languages, Laws of Regular Expressions, Kleene’s Theorem 1 and 2, Properties and Limitations of FSM, FSM with Output: Moore and Mealy Machines, Arden’s Theorem with proof, Closure Properties of Regular Sets, Pumping Lemma for Regular Grammers, Myhill-Nerode Theorem, Minimization of FA.

 

UNIT – II

Formal Grammars: Definition, Construction of Context Free Grammar, Derivation, Parse Trees, Ambiguity, Removal of Ambiguity, Simplification of Context Free Grammar, CNF and GNF, Closure properties of CFL, Pumping Lemma for CFL.

Pushdown Automaton: Introduction, Types of PDA, Designing of PDA’s, Conversion from PDA to CFG and vice-versa, Applications, Parsing: Early's, Cook-Kasami-Young, Tomito's.

 

UNIT – III

Linear Bounded Automata (LBA), Turing Machines (TM), variants of TM: Multitape, Restricted and Universal TM; TM and Computers. Recursive and recursively-enumerable languages and Properties.

Decidability: Post’s correspondence problem, Rice's theorem, Cook’s Theorem, decidability of membership, emptiness and equivalence problems of languages.

 

UNIT – IV

Decidable languages and problems, Halting problem of TM, Diagonalization method, Turing machines and other undecidable problems.

Computable Functions: Primitive recursive functions, Recursion theorem. Russels’s Paradox, Tractable and Intractable problems, Computability and Non-computability and examples of non-computable problems.

 

Text Books

1. John C. Martin, “Introduction to languages and the theory of computation”, McGraw Hill.

2. Peter Linz, “An introduction to formal language & automata”, Jones & Bartlett publications.

 

Reference Books:

1. Hopcroft, J. E. & Ullman, J. D., “Formal languages and their relation to Automata”, Pearson Education.

2. Lewis, H.R. & Papadimitrious, C.H., “Elements of the theory of computation”. PHI Learning.

3. Michael Sipser, “Introduction to the Theory of Computation”, Cengage Learning.


MCA-16-35                OBJECT ORIENTED ANALYSIS AND DESIGN USING UML

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 75, Internal: 25)               Time: 3 hours             Credits: 4

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all.  Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

Objectives: Object Oriented Analysis and Design Using UML course provides instruction and practical experience focusing on the effective use of object -oriented technologies and the judicious use of software modeling as applied to a software development process.

Learning Outcomes:

l  To understand the fundamental concepts of UML, relationships and diagrams of UML.

l  To know how UML provides extensible mechanisms

l  To know how to identify objects, classes, relationships and attributes draw class diagram.

l  To learn the concepts of state modeling and draw state diagram

l  To understand the interaction modeling, use-case modeling and activity modeling.

l  To know the object oriented analysis and design process.

UNIT-I

UML: Principles of modeling, UML Things Structural, Behavioral, Grouping, Annotational. Relationships in UML Dependency, Association, Generalization, Realization. Overview of diagrams in UML Class diagram, Object diagram, Use-Case diagram, Sequence diagram, Collaboration diagram, Statechart diagram, Activity diagram, Component diagram, Deployment diagram.  UML Semantic Rules Names, Scope, Visibility, Integrity, Execution. Mechanisms in the UML Specifications, Adornments, Common Divisions, Extensibility Mechanisms.

UNIT-II

Modeling as a Design Technique: Abstraction, Encapsulation, Modularity, Hierarchy, Typing, Concurrency, Persistence of objects. Purpose of modeling,

Class Model Object & Class, Links & Associations, Generalization & Inheritance, Association Ends - Multiplicity, Role names, Ordering, Qualification, Aggregation, Link attributes & Link class, Abstract class, Metadata, Constraints. Constructing class diagram.

UNIT-III

State Modeling:  Event, State, Activity, Action, Transitions & Conditions, State diagrams, Nested state diagrams, signal generalization, concurrency, relationships between class and state models.

Interaction  Modeling:  use  case  models,  use  case  relationships,  sequence  models,  procedural  sequence models, activity models, special constructs for activity models.

UNIT-IV

System Analysis & design: System development stages, system conception, analysis, domain class model, domain state model, iterating the analysis.

Application interaction model, application class model, application state model, adding operations

System Design: estimating performance, make a reuse plan, organize the system into subsystem, identifying concurrency, allocating subsystems to processors and tasks, management of data stores, handling global resources, choosing software control strategies, handling boundary conditions, setting trade-off priorities, selecting an architect style.

Class Design: bridging gap, realize use cases with operations, designing algorithms, design optimization, adjustment of inheritance, organize classes & associations.

 

Text Books:

1.        Grady Booch, James Rumbaugh, Ivar Jacobson, The Unified Modeling Language User Guide, Pearson education, 2007

2.        M. Blaha, J. Rumbaugh, Object-Oriented Modeling and Design with UML, Pearson Education-2007

Reference Books:

1.        J. Rumbaugh, M. Blaha, W. Premerlani, F. Eddy, W. Lorensen, Object-Oriented Modeling and Design, Prentice Hall of India-1998

2.        Satzinger, Jackson, Burd, Object-Oriented Analysis & Design with the Unified Process, Thomson-2007

3.        Grady Booch, Object Oriented Analysis & Design, Addison Wesley-1994

MCA-16–38                SEMInar

 

Maximum marks: 50                                      Time: 1/2 hours                      CREDITS: 1

 

Seminar

Each student shall individually prepare and submit a seminar report within stipulated time. A panel consisting of two teachers (internal) should evaluate the seminar report and the presentation. Marks should be distributed considering report writing, presentation, technical content, depth of knowledge, brevity and references and their participation in seminar. The time allotted for presentation will be 30 minutes.

 


MCA-16-41     design and analysis of algorithms

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 75, Internal: 25)               Time: 3 hours             Credits: 4

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

Objectives: The objective of this course is to provide the in-depth coverage of various algorithm design techniques. It focuses on various problems and their solutions using different algorithm design techniques.

 

Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course students should be able to:

l  Design solutions to problems using various algorithm techniques.

l  Solve the tractable and intractable problems with problem solving methodologies.

l  Understand the complexity of problems and apply the solutions accordingly.

 

UNIT – I

Introduction: Algorithms, Role of algorithms in computing, Complexity of algorithms, Analyzing algorithms, designing algorithms, asymptotic notations.

Divide and Conquer: Complexity of iterative programs and recursive programs, solving recurrence equations: back substitution method, recursion tree method, masters theorem.

Analysis of heap sort and quick sort; Counting sort, Radix sort, Bucket sort, Lower bounds for sorting.

 

UNIT – II

Hash Tables, Hash functions, Collision handling in hashing, analyzing various operations on Binary search tree. Introduction to Red-black trees.

Dynamic Programming (DP): Elements of DP, Matrix chain multiplication, Longest common subsequence, optimal binary search trees.

UNIT – III

Greedy Techniques (GT): Elements of GT, Activity selection problem, Huffman codes, Knapsack Problem.

Graph Algorithms: Single source shortest path: Analysis of Dijkstra’s Algorithm, Limitations of Dijkstra’s Algorithm, Negative weight cycle, Bellman-Ford algorithm. All Pairs Shortest Path: Relation of Shortest path and matrix multiplication, Analysis of Floyd Warshall algorithm. Maximum Flow: Flow network, Ford-Fulkerson method.

UNIT – IV

Strings: Storage of strings, naive string-matching algorithm, Rabin-Karp string matching algorithm.

Computational complexity: Notion of Polynomial time algorithms, Complexity classes: P, NP, NP-Hard and NP-Complete, Polynomial time verification, Reducibility, NP-Completeness, Examples of NP-Complete and NP-Hard problems: Traveling Salesman Problem, Knapsack, Bin Packing, Satisfiability, Vertex Cover, Clique, Independent Set.

 

Text Books:

·                  Cormen, Leiserson, Rivest, “Introduction to Algorithms”, PHI India.

·                  Neapolitan R., “Foundations of Algorithms”, Jones and Bartlett Learning. 

 

Reference Books:

5.      Cooper A., “Computability Theory”, Chapman and Hall/ CRC Press.

6.      Robert Sedgewick, “Algorithms in C”, Pearson Education India.

7.      Steven Skiena, “The Algorithm Design Manual”, Springer India.

8.      Reiter, Johnson, “Limits of Computation”, Chapman and Hall/ CRC Press.

 

 

 

 

MCA-16-42                compiler design

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 75, Internal: 25)               Time: 3 hours             Credits: 4

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all.  Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

Objectives: The objective of the course is to provide in-depth coverage of underlying concepts & techniques used in compiler design and to cover major topics in compilation Theory. This course will make students ready for job assignments involving compilers and prepare students to undertake projects on compilers Construction.

 

Learning Outcomes:  At the end of course the students should be able:

l  To understand overall process of compilation

l  To work on assignments on compilers

l  To undertake various students-oriented projects on compiler construction

l  To design a simple programming language and implement a compiler for such language

l  To use compilation techniques in software design

 

Unit – I

Compilers and Translators, Need of Translators, Tools used for compilation, Structure and Phases of Compiler, Single-Pass and Multi-Pass Compilers, Bootstrapping, Compiler Construction Tools, Phases of Compilation process, Classification of grammars

Lexical Analysis: Design, Finite Automata and Regular Expressions, Process of Lexical Analysis, Lexical Analyzer generators, Derivations and parse trees

 

Unit – II

Parsing Techniques: Top down Parsing- Predictive Parsers, Left Recursion and its removal, Recursive Descent Parsers, LL Grammars

Bottom-up parsing:  Shift Reduce Parsing, Operator Precedence Parsing, LR Parsers, LR grammars, Comparison of parsing methods, Parser Generators

 

Unit – III

Semantic Analysis: Syntax-Directed Translation Schemes

Building Symbol Table, Data Structures for symbol table, representing scope information

An overview of Run-time Storage Administration

Error Detection and Recovery: Errors, Lexical-Phase Errors, Syntactic Phase Errors, Semantic Errors.

 

Unit – IV

Intermediate Source Forms: Postfix Notation, Syntax Trees, Triples & Quadruples

Code Optimization:  Potential cases of Code Optimization, Optimization of basic blocks, Local and Global optimizations, Code Improving Transformation

Code Generator:  Issues in the design of a code generator

 

Text Books

1. Alfred V Aho, “Principles of Compiler Design”, Narosa Publishing House.

2. Jean Paul Tremblay and Sorenson, “The Theory and Practice of Compiler Writing”, McGraw Hill.

 

Reference Books:

1. Dhamdhere D.M, “System programming and operating system”, McGraw Hill.

2. Beck L. Leland, “System Software”, Pearson Education.

3. Aho, Sethi, & Ullman, “Compilers Principles, Techniques and Tools”, Pearson Education.

4. Fischer, “Crafting a compiler in C”, Pearson Education.

MCA-16-43                 data warehousing and mining

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 75, Internal: 25)               Time: 3 hours             Credits: 4

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all.  Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

Objectives: The objective of this course is to provide the in- depth coverage of fundamentals of data warehousing and mining. It focus on various concepts of data warehousing like architecture, multidimensional model, data generation by attribute etc. It deals with gathering and analyzing large sets of data, identifying applications of data mining and to discuss next generation technique of data mining.

 

Learning Objective: At the end of this course students should be able to:

l  Understand the concepts, benefits and problem area associated with data warehousing and mining.

l  Understand the various architecture and components of data warehousing.

l  Understand the issues to be resolved which occur when implementing data warehouse.

l  Understand the various mining techniques like clustering, density based method and their evaluations etc.

l  Understand the latest data mining techniques like tree pruning, association rule mining and their applications.

UNIT – I

Data Warehouse: Basic concepts, The Data Warehouse - A Brief History, Characteristics, Difference between Operational Database Systems and Data Warehouse, Architecture for a Data Warehouse, Fact and Dimension Tables, Data Warehouse Schemas, Data Cube : A Multidimensional Data Model, Data Cube Computation Methods, Typical OLAP Operations, Data Warehouse Design and Usage, Data Warehouse Implementation, Data Generalization by Attribute Oriented Induction.

 

UNIT – II

Data Mining: Introduction: Motivation, Importance, Knowledge Discovery Process, Data Mining Functionalities, Interesting Patterns, Classification of Data Mining Systems, Major issues, Data Objects and Attribute Types. Data Preprocessing: Overview, Data Cleaning, Data Integration, Data Reduction, Data Transformation and Data Discretization. Data Mining Models: Directed Data Mining Models, Directed Data Mining Methodology. Data Visualization. Outliers, Types of Outliers and Challenges of Outlier Detection.

 

UNIT – III

Data Mining Classical Techniques: Statistics – Similarity Models, Steps for Designing Similarity Models, Table Lookup Model. Clustering- Requirement for Cluster Analysis, Clustering Methods- Partitioning Methods, Hierarchical Methods, Density-Based Methods, Grid-Based Methods, Evaluation of Clustering. Nearest Neighborhood- Memory Based Reasoning, Challenges of Memory Based Reasoning,

 

UNIT – IV

Data Mining Next Generation Techniques: Decision Tree- Decision Tree Induction, Attribute Selection Measures, Tree Pruning. Association Rule Mining- Market Basket Analysis, Frequent Itemset Mining using Apriori Algorithm, Improving the Efficiency of Apriori, Neural Network- Bayesian Belief Networks, Classification by Backpropagation. Data Mining Applications, Data Mining Trends and Tools.

 

Reference Books:

1. J Hanes, M. Kamber, “Data Mining Concepts and Techniques”, Elsevier India.

2. G.S. Linoff, M.J.A. Berry, “Data Mining Techniques”, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.

3. A. Berson, S.J. Smith, “Data Warehousing, Data Mining & OLAP”, Tata McGraw-Hill.

MCA-16-44                 COMPUTER GRAPHICS

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 75, Internal: 25)               Time: 3 hours             Credits: 4

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all.  Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

Objectives: The objective of this course is to provide the in-depth coverage of various concepts of computer graphics. The students will be able to understand and use computer graphics in real-world.

 

Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course students should be able to:

l  Gain knowledge about graphics hardware devices and software used.

l  Understand two dimensional and three dimensional creation and manipulation of pictures/objects.

l  Understand various input techniques and animation techniques used in graphics.

 

UNIT – I

Introduction to Computer Graphics and its applications, Components and working of Interactive Graphics;

Video Display Devices:  Raster scan and Random Scan displays, Display Processors; Resolution, Aspect Ratio, Refresh CRT, interlacing; Color CRT monitors, LookUp tables, Plasma Panel and LCD monitors, Interactive Input and Output Devices: keyboard, mouse, trackball, joystick, light pen, digitizers; image scanners, Touch Panels; Voice systems; printers, plotters; Graphics Software; Coordinate Representations;

UNIT – II

Drawing Geometry: Symmetrical and Simple DDA line drawing algorithm, Bresenham’s line Algorithm; loading frame buffer; Symmetrical DDA for drawing circle, Polynomial method for circle drawing; circle drawing using polar coordinates, Bresenham’s circle drawing;  Generation of ellipse; parametric representation of cubic curves, drawing Bezier curves;

Filled-Area Primitives: Flood fill algorithm, Boundary fill algorithm, Scan-line polygon fill algorithm

UNIT – III

2-D Transformations: translation, rotation, scaling, matrix representations and homogeneous coordinates, composite transformations, general pivot point rotation, general fixed point scaling, Shearing; Reflection ; Reflection about an arbitrary line;

2-D Viewing: window, viewport; 2-D viewing transformation, zooming, panning; Clipping operations: point and line clipping, Cohen-Sutherland line clipping, mid-point subdivision line clipping, Liang-Barsky line clipping, Sutherland-Hodgman polygon clipping; Weiler-Atherton polygon Clipping

Pointing and positioning techniques; rubber band technique; dragging;

UNIT – IV

3-D Graphics: 3-D modeling of objects, 3D transformation matrices for translation, scaling and rotation, parallel projection: Orthographic and oblique projection; perspective projection; Hidden surface removal: Z-buffer, depth-sorting, area subdivision, BSP-Tree method; Ray casting; Shading: Modelling light intensities, Gouraud shading, Phong shading; Introduction to Animation, Tweening, Morphing, Fractals;

 

Text Books:

1. Donald Hearn, M. Pauline Baker, Computer Graphics, Pearson Education.

2. Foley etc., Computer Graphics Principles & Practice, Pearson Education.

 

Reference Books:

4.      D.P. Mukherjee, Fundamentals of Computer Graphics and Multimedia, PHI.

5.      Newmann & Sproull, Principles of Interactive Computer Graphics, McGraw Hill.

6.      Rogers, Procedural Elements of Computer Graphics, McGraw Hill.

7.      Anirban Mukhopadhyay, Arup Chattopadhyay, Introduction to Computer Graphics and Multimedia, Vikas Publications.

8.      Zhigang Xiang, Roy Plastock, Computer Graphics, Tata McGraw Hill.

9.      Malay K. Pakhira, Computer Graphics, Multimedia and Animation, PHI

 

MCA-16-45                 LINUX AND SHELL PROGRAMMING

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 75, Internal: 25)               Time: 3 hours             Credits: 4

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all.  Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

Objectives: The objectives of this course is to provide the in-depth coverage of various concepts of Linux. Linux administration is an essential course for the students.

 

Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course students should be able to:

l  Install and understand the basic concepts of Linux administration.

l  Understand the C environment under Linux.

l  Understand the user management and security concepts in Linux.

l  Appreciate and use shell programming in Linux.

UNIT – I

Introduction: Basic features, architecture, distributions, Installation requirements; Kernel, Shell.

File System: boot block, super block, inode table, data blocks, accessing files, storage of files, standard directories, system calls for files, file and disk related commands, hard disk partitions; Installing Linux OS, System startup and shut down processes, init and run levels, rc and init files.

 

UNIT – II

C language compiler, layout of C program in memory, process environment, kernel support, process images, managing zombie and orphan processes, use of makefiles, dependency calculations, dynamic loader, debugging with gdb.

UNIT – III

User Management: Adding new users and groups, super users, creating and mounting file systems. User management commands.

Security and Connections: viewing and changing the permissions and ownerships of files and directories, creating networks, Signal generation and handling, Environment variables, Commands: man, chmod, fchmod, chown, lchown, ping, ifconfig, raise, alarm, pause, abort etc.

 

UNIT – IV

Shell: meaning, types; connecting processes with pipes, tee, redirect input and output, background processes, managing multiple processes, changing priority, scheduling of processes at command, process related commands.

Shell Programming: Introduction, shell programming in various shells, file name substitution, read command, operators, conditional statements, looping and case statements, expr statement, command line arguments, parameter passing and arguments, associative arrays, string and mathematical functions, arrays and functions, libraries, shell variables, shell programs to automate system tasks, interrupt processing, shell scripts for administrators, debugging shell scripts, introduction to egrep.

 

Text Books:

1. Matthew Neil, Stones Richjard, “Beginning Linux Programming”, 4th Ed., Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.

2. John Goerzen, “Linux Programming Bible”, IDG Books, New Delhi.

 

Reference Books:

1. Negus Christopher, “Linux Bible”, 8th Ed., Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.

2. Petersen Richard, “Linux: The Complete Reference”, 6th Ed., Tata Mcgraw Hill.

3. Venkateshmurthy M.G., “Introduction to Unix & Shell Programming”, Pearson Education.

MCA-16–48                SEMInar

 

Maximum marks: 50                                      Time: 1/2 hours                      CREDITS: 1

 

Seminar

Each student shall individually prepare and submit a seminar report within stipulated time. A panel consisting of two teachers (internal) should evaluate the seminar report and the presentation. Marks should be distributed considering report writing, presentation, technical content, depth of knowledge, brevity and references and their participation in seminar. The time allotted for presentation will be 30 minutes.

 

MCA – 16-51              ADVANCED WEB TECHNOLOGIES