SCHEME OF EXAMINATION FOR MASTER OF COMPUTER APPLICATIONS (M.C.A.) w.e.f. Academic Session 2014-15

Paper Code

Nomenclature of Paper

Exam

External

Internal

Total

 

 

Time

Marks

Marks

Marks

 

 

(hrs.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Max

Pass

Max

Pass

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1st Semester

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-11

PROGRAMMING IN C

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-12

COMPUTER ORGANIZATION

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-13

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-14

DISCRETE MATHEMATICAL STRUCTURES

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-15

COMPUTER ORIENTED NUMERICAL AND

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

STATISTICAL METHODS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-16

S/W LAB – I BASED ON MCA-14-11

3

100

40

 

 

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-17

S/W LAB – II BASED ON MCA-14-15

3

100

40

 

 

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-18

SEMINAR

 

 

 

20

8

20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

600

 

120

 

720

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2nd Semester

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-21

SYSTEM PROGRAMMING

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-22

OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING USING C++

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-23

PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-24

DATA STRUCTURES

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-25

WEB TECHNOLOGIES

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-26

S/W LAB–III BASED ON MCA-14-22 & MCA-14-24

3

100

40

 

 

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-27

S/W LAB–IV BASED ON MCA-14-25

3

100

40

 

 

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-28

SEMINAR

 

 

 

20

8

20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

600

 

120

 

720

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3rd Semester

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-31

OBJECT ORIENTED ANALYSIS AND DESIGN USING

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

UML

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-32

COMPUTER NETWORKS AND DATA

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

COMMUNICATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-33

DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-34

DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-35

OPERATING SYSTEMS

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-36

S/W LAB – V BASED ON MCA-14-31

3

100

40

 

 

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-37

S/W LAB – VI BASED ON MCA-14-34

3

100

40

 

 

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-38

SEMINAR

 

 

 

20

8

20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

600

 

120

 

720

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4th Semester

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-41

PROGRAMMING IN JAVA

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-42

ADVANCED COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-43

DATA WAREHOUSING AND MINING

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-44

COMPUTER GRAPHICS

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-45

ELECTIVE

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


MCA-14-46

S/W LAB–VII BASED ON MCA-14-41

3

100

40

 

 

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-47

S/W LAB-VIII BASED ON MCA-14-44

3

100

40

 

 

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-48

SEMINAR

 

 

 

20

8

20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

600

 

120

 

720

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ELECTIVE: - I. INFORMATION SECURITY

 

II. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

 

III. INFORMATION SYSTEMS

 

IV. SECURITY IN COMPUTING

 

 

SCHEME OF EXAMINATION FOR MASTER OF COMPUTER APPLICATIONS (M.C.A.) w.e.f. Academic Session 2016-17

 

5th Semester

 

 

 

Exam

External

Internal

Total

Paper Code

Nomenclature of Paper

Time

Marks

Marks

Marks

 

 

(hrs.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Max

Pass

Max

Pass

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-51

COMPILER DESIGN

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-52

ADVANCED WEB TECHNOLOGY

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-53

LINUX AND SHELL PROGRAMMING

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-54

MOBILE APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-55

ELECTIVE

3

80

32

20

8

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-56

S/W LAB–IX BASED ON MCA-14-52

3

100

40

 

 

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-57

S/W LAB–X BASED ON MCA-14-53 AND MCA-14-54

3

100

40

 

 

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-58

SEMINAR

 

 

 

20

8

20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

600

240

120

48

720

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ELECTIVE: - I. THEORY OF COMPUTATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

II. DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III. SOFT COMPUTING

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IV. SYSTEM SIMULATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

V. CLOUD COMPUTING

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VI. HIGH PERFORMANCE NETWORKS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6th Semester

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PROJECT REPORT

 

150

60

 

 

150

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-61

PRESENTATION AND VIVA-VOCE

 

150

60

 

 

150

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTERNAL ASSESSMENT

 

 

 

100

40

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

300

120

100

40

400

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GRAND TOTAL (FROM SEMESTER I TO VI)

 

3300

1320

700

280

4000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sessional Marks in each theory paper will be awarded by the concerned teacher on the basis of marks obtained in one class test (of 10 Marks and 90 minutes duration) and evaluation of assignments (of 10 Marks).

 

Note: Size of Groups for all practical and viva-voce examinations should not be more than thirty.

 

Seminar

 

Each student shall individually prepare and submit a seminar report within stipulated time. Marks should be distributed considering report writing, presentation, technical content, depth of knowledge, brevity, references and their participation in seminar.

 

Internal Marks

 

Internal Marks in each theory paper will be awarded by the concerned teacher on the basis of marks obtained in one class test (of 10 Marks) and evaluation of assignments (of 10 Marks).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-11                     PROGRAMMING IN C

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)                                               Time: 3 hours

 

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT – I

 

Overview of C: Structure & Memory Layout of C Program; Elements of C, Data types; Storage classes in C: auto, extern, register and static storage class; Header files: Using pre-defined and user-defined header files, Operators: Arithmetic, relational, logical, bitwise, unary, assignment and conditional operators, side effects, precedence & associativity of operators.

 

UNIT – II

 

Input/output: Unformatted & formatted I/O function in C.

 

Control statements: Sequencing, Selection: if statement, switch statement; Repetition: for, while, and do-while loop; break, continue, goto statements.

 

Functions: Definition, prototype, parameters passing techniques, recursion, built-in functions.

 

UNIT – III

 

Arrays: Definition, types, initialization, processing an array, passing arrays to functions, returning arrays from functions, String handling.

 

Pointers: Declaration, operations on pointers, pointers and arrays, dynamic memory allocation, pointers and functions, pointers and strings.

 

UNIT – IV

 

Structure & Union: Definition, processing, Structure and pointers, passing structures to functions, use of union.

 

Data files: Opening and closing a file, I/O operations on files, Error handling during I/O operation, Random access to files.

 

Preprocessor commands and Macro definitions.

 

Text Books:

 

1.    Forouzan Behrouz, “Computer Science: A Structured Programming Approach Using C”, Cengage Learning.

 

2.    Balagurusamy E., “Programming in ANSI C”, Tata McGraw-Hill.

 

Reference Books:

 

1.    Gottfried, Byron S., “Programming with C”, Tata McGraw Hill.

 

2.    Jeri R. Hanly & Elliot P. Koffman, “Problem Solving and Program Design in C”, Pearson Education.

 

3.    Yashwant Kanetker, “Let us C”, BPB Publications.

 

4.    Rajaraman, V., “Computer Programming in C”, Prentice Hall of India Learning.


 

MCA-14–12                    COMPUTER ORGANIZATION

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)                                               Time: 3 hours

 

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT – I

 

Digital Logic Fundamentals: Boolean algebra–basic functions, manipulating Boolean functions, K-maps and Quine McCluskey procedures. Combination Logic–multiplexers, decoders, encoders, comparators, adders & subtractors, BCD-to-Seven segment decoder. Basic Sequential Circuits–Flip-flops (RS, JK, T-type and D-Type), Ripple counter, Shift Register.

 

UNIT – II

 

Basic Computer Organization: Generic computer organization – system bus, instruction cycle, timing diagram of memory read and write operations, CPU organization, memory subsystem organization and interfacing – types of memory, chip organization, memory subsystem configuration, multibyte data organization, I/O subsystem organization and interfacing, memory subsystem configuration.

 

Register Transfer Language (RTL): different types of micro-operations, using RTL to specify digital systems – specification of digital components, simple systems, Modulo-6 counter.

 

UNIT – III

 

CPU Design: design and implementation of simple CPU-fetching, decoding & executing instruction, establishing required data paths, designing hardwired control unit.

 

Microsequencer Control Unit Design: microsequencer operations, microinstruction formats, design and implementation of a simple microsequencer, reducing number of microinstructions.

 

Computer Arithmetic: Hardware implementation of unsigned & signed (addition & subtraction, multiplication, booth’s algorithm, division). Floating-point numbers (IEEE 754 standard) – addition, subtraction, multiplication, division.

 

UNIT – IV

 

Memory Organization: Hierarchical memory system, associative memory, cache memory – associative, direct and set associative mappings, replacing & writing data in cache, cache performance, virtual memory - paging, segmentation, memory protection.

 

I/O Organization: Asynchronous data transfer - source and destination - initiated, handshaking, programmed I/O, interrupts, DMA, IOP, serial communication–UART, RS-232C standard, USB standard.

 

Text Books:

 

1.    John D. Carpinelli, “Computer Systems Organization & Architecture”, Pearson Education.

 

2.    Stallings W., “Computer Organization and Architecture”, Pearson Education.

 

Reference Books:

 

1.    Rajaraman, V., Radhakrishanan,T. “An Introduction To Digital Computer Design”, PHI Learning.

 

2.    Mano, M. Morris “Digital Logic and Computer Design”, Pearson Education.

 

3.    Tanenbaum A.S., Todd Austin, “Structured Computer Organization”, PHI Learning.

 

4.    Carl Hamacher, Zvonko Vranesic, Safwat Zaky, “Computer Organization”, Tata McGraw Hill.


MCA-14–13                    SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)                                                Time: 3 hours

 

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT – I

 

Introduction: Software Crisis-problem and causes, Software Processes, Software life cycle models: Waterfall, Prototype, Evolutionary and Spiral models, Overview of Quality Standards like ISO 9001, SEI-CMM, CMMI, PCMM, Six Sigma.

 

Software Metrics: Size Metrics like LOC, Token Count, Function Count, Design Metrics, Data Structure Metrics, Information Flow Metrics, cyclomatic complexity, Halstead Complexity measures.

 

UNIT – II

 

Software Project Planning: Cost estimation, static, Single and multivariate models, COCOMO model, Putnam Resource Allocation Model, Risk management, project scheduling, personnel planning, team structure, Software configuration management, quality assurance, project monitoring.

 

Software Requirement Analysis and Specifications: Structured Analysis, Data Flow Diagrams, Data Dictionaries, Entity-Relationship diagrams, Software Requirement and Specifications, Behavioral and non-behavioral requirements.

 

UNIT – III

 

Software Design: Design fundamentals, problem partitioning and abstraction, design methodology, Cohesion & Coupling, Function Oriented Design and User Interface Design.

 

Coding: Programming style, structured programming.

 

Software reliability: Metric and specification, Musa and JM reliability model, fault avoidance and tolerance, exception handling, defensive programming.

 

UNIT – IV

 

Software Testing: Functional testing: Boundary Value Analysis, Equivalence class testing, Cause effect graphing, Structural testing: Control flow based and data flow based testing, loop testing, mutation testing, load, stress and performance testing, software testing strategies: unit testing, integration testing, System testing, Alpha and Beta testing, debugging.

 

Static Testing: Formal Technical Reviews, Walk Through, Code Inspection.

 

Software Maintenance: Types of Maintenance, Maintenance Process, Maintenance characteristics, Reverse Engineering, Software Re-engineering.

 

Text Books:

 

1.    Pressman R. S. , “Software Engineering – A practitioner’s approach”, Tata McGraw Hill.

 

2.    Sommerville, “Software Engineering”, Pearson Education.

 

Reference Books:

 

1.      Pfleeger, “Software Engineering: Theory and Practice”, Pearson Education.

 

2.      P. Jalote, “An Integrated approach to Software Engineering”, Narosa Publications.

 

3.      R. Fairley, “Software Engineering Concepts”, Tata McGraw Hill.

 

4.      James Peter, W Pedrycz, “Software Engineering”, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.


MCA-14-14

DISCRETE MATHEMATICAL STRUCTURES

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)

Time: 3 hours

 

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT – I

 

Set Theory: Basic Set Theory, Operations on Sets, Algebra of sets, Venn Diagrams.

 

Relations: Binary Relations, Complement of relations, Inverse of relations, Composite relations, Properties, Equivalence, Partial Order and Total order relations.

 

Functions: Functions on Set, Domain, Co-domain, Representation of Functions, Types, Identity and Inverse Functions, Composition of Functions, Applications

 

UNIT –II

 

Propositional Calculus: Propositional logic, Equivalences, Predicates , Quantifiers, Nested Quantifiers, Rules of Inference, Normal Forms, Proofs: Methods, Strategy.

 

Counting: Pigeonhole Principle, Inclusion-Exclusion Principle, Permutations and Combinations, Binomial Coefficients, Counting Principles, Applications.

 

UNIT –III

 

Advanced Counting Techniques: Recurrence Relations, Solving Recurrence Relations, Divide and Conquer Algorithms and Recurrence Relations, Solution of Recurrence Relations by the method of Generating Function..

 

Latices and boolean algebra: Lattices, Hasse Diagram, Principle of Duality, Types of Lattices, Special Lattices, Boolean Expression, Equivalent circuits, Dual, Normal Forms.

 

UNIT –IV

 

Graphs: Introduction, Terminology, Types of Graphs, Representation of Graphs, Paths and Circuits, Cut-set and Cut - Vertices, Graph Isomorphism, Homomorphism, Connectivity, Bipartite Graphs, Subgraphs, Operations on Graphs, Euler and Hamiltonian Paths, Shortest Path Problem, Planar & Dual Graphs, Coloring Covering and Partitioning.

 

Tree: Tree Notations, Properties of tree, Types of Tree, Minimum Spanning Tree (MST).

 

Text Books:

 

1.      Kenneth G. Rosen, “Discrete Mathematics And Its Applications”, Tata McGraw Hill.

 

2.      Koshy T., “Discrete Mathematics with Applications”, Elsevier India.

 

Reference Books:

 

1.      Eric Gosett, “Discrete Mathematics with proof”, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.

 

2.      Seymour Lipshutz, “Schaum Outlines of Discrete Mathematics”, Tata McGraw-Hill.

 

3.      Olympia Nicodemy, “Discrete Mathematics”, CBS Publisher


 

 

MCA-14-15 COMPUTER ORIENTED NUMERICAL AND STATISTICAL METHODS Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20) Time: 3 hours

 

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT – I

 

Iterative Methods: Bisection, False position, Newton-Raphson methods, Discussion of convergences. Solution of Simultaneous Linear Equations and ordinary Differential Equations: Gauss elimination method, Ill-conditioned equations, Gauss-Seidal iterative method.

 

Interpolation: Polynomial    interpolation, Difference tables, Inverse interpolation.

 

UNIT – II

 

Ordinary Differential Equations: Euler method, Euler’s Modified Method, Taylor-Series Method, Runge-Kutta method, Predictor-Corrector methods.

 

Numerical Differentiation and Integration: Differentiation formulae based on polynomial fit, Pitfalls in differentiation, Trapezoidal, Simpson's rules.

 

Curve Fitting: Polynomial fitting and other curve fitting.

 

UNIT – III

 

Approximation of functions: Approximation of functions by Taylor series and Chebyshev polynomials. Statistics: Frequency distributions, Measures of central tendency, dispersion, moments, skewness and kurtosis. Binomial, Poisson and Normal distributions.

 

Correlation and Regression.

 

UNIT - IV

 

Statistical methods: Sample distributions, Test of Significance: Chi-Square Test, T and F test.

 

Analysis of Variance: One-way classification, ANOVA Table, Two-way classification (with one observation per cell).

 

Time Series Analysis: Components and Analysis of Time Series, Measurement of Trend, Seasonal fluctuations and cyclic movement.

 

Text Books:

 

1.      Rajaraman V., “Computer Oriented Numerical Methods”, PHI.

 

2.      Gupta S.P. and Kapoor V.K., “Fundamentals of Mathematical statistics”, Sultan Chand & Sons.

 

Reference Books:

 

1.      Gupta S.P. and Kapoor V.K., “Fundamentals of Applied Statistics”, Sultan Chand & Sons.

 

2.      Graybill, “Introduction to Statistics”, Tata McGraw Hill.

 

3.      Anderson, “Statistical Modelling”, Tata McGraw Hill.


MCA-14-21                     SYSTEM PROGRAMMING

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)                                                Time: 3 hours

 

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT – I

 

System Software: Definition, Goals of System Software, Program Development and Production Environments, Software Portability, Programs as components, Quick and Dirty Programming, User-Centric and System-Centric view of System Software.

 

Language Processors: Types of Language Processors, Program Generation, Program Execution, Program Translation and Interpretation, Fundamentals of Language Processing, Symbol Tables.

 

UNIT – II

 

Assemblers: Elements of Assembly language Programming, Pass Structure of Assemblers, Design of Two-pass assembler, Intermediate code forms, Program Listing and Error reporting, Organizational and Design issues in assemblers.

 

Macros and Macro Preprocessors: Macro Definition and Call, Macro expansion, Nested Macro calls, Design of a Macro preprocessor, Processing of Macro definitions, Use of Stack in expansion of macro calls, Design of a macro assembler

 

UNIT – III

 

Linkers and Loaders: Linking & Relocation, Design of a Linker, Self-Relocating, Dynamic Linking, Linking for program overlays, Loaders, Absolute and Relocating loaders.

 

Scanning and Parsing: Chomsky hierarchy of formal languages, Ambiguous grammars, Scanning, Parsing: Top-down and Bottom-up Parsing.

 

UNIT – IV

 

Compilers and Interpreters: Binding and Binding times, Data Structures of compilers, Scoping rules, Memory allocation, Static and dynamic memory allocation and deallocation, Recursion, Compilation of expressions, Postfix notations, Expression trees, Compilation of Control structures, Code Optimization, Local and Global optimization, Overview and benefits of interpretation, Pure and impure interpreters.

 

Text books:

 

1.      Dhamdhere D.M, “System programming”, Tata McGraw-Hill.

 

2.      Beck L. Leland, “System Software”, Pearson Education.

 

Reference Books:

 

1.      Aho, Sethi, & Ullman, “Compilers Principles, Techniques and Tools”, Pearson Education.

 

2.      Donovan J. John, “System Programming”, Tata McGraw Hill.


 

MCA-14-22                      OBJECT ORIENTED PROGRAMMING USING C++

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)                                               Time: 3 hours

 

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT - I

 

Introduction: Object-Oriented features of C++, Comparison of C with C++, Class and Objects, Inline functions, Static data members and member functions, Read-Only objects, Pointers, Dynamic memory allocation and deallocation, constructors and destructors, Dynamic objects, array of pointers to object, local and global class, nested and empty class, preprocessor directives, Header files and namespaces. Console I/O: Hierarchy of console stream classes, unformatted and formatted I/O operations, Manipulators.

 

UNIT - II

 

Compile-time Polymorphism: Operator Overloading-overloading unary and binary arithmetic and relational operators, overloading subscript, insertion, extraction, new and delete operators; function overloading

 

Friend Function and Friend Class: Friend function, overloading operators by friend function, friend class Type Conversion: Basic type conversion, conversion between Objects and Basic Types, conversion between objects of different classes.

 

UNIT - III

 

Inheritance: Base and Derived Classes, Protected Members, Casting Base-Class Pointers to Derived-Class Pointers, Using Member Functions, Overriding Base–Class Members in a Derived Class, Public, Protected and Private Inheritance, Using Constructors and Destructors in derived Classes, Implicit Derived–Class Object To Base-Class Object Conversion, Composition Vs. Inheritance.

 

Virtual Functions & Derivations: Virtual functions and their needs, Pure virtual function, virtual destructor, virtual derivation, abstract class.

 

UNIT - IV

 

Generic Programming: Function Templates, Overloading Template Functions, Class Template, Class Templates and Non-Type Parameters.

 

Exception Handling: Try, Throw, Catch, Throwing an Exception, Catching an Exception, Re-throwing an Exception.

 

File Handling: Hierarchy of File Stream classes, Opening and Closing files, File modes, testing for errors, File pointers and their manipulations, ASCII & Binary files, Sequential and Random access files.

 

Text Books:

 

1.      Bjarne Stroustrup, “The C++ Programming Language”, Pearson Education.

 

2.      Balaguruswami, E., “Object Oriented Programming In C++”, Tata McGraw-Hill.

 

Reference Books:

 

1.      Herbert Shildt, “C++: The Complete Reference”, Tata McGraw-Hill.

 

2.      Joyce Farrel., “Object Oriented Programming Using C++”, Cengage Learning.

 

3.       Forouzan, Gilberg, “Computer Science: A Structured Programming Approach Using C++”, Cengage Learning.

 

4.      Robert Lafore, “Object Oriented Programming in C++”, Techmedia SAMS.

 

5.      Bhave M.P., Patekar S.A., “Object Oriented Programming with C++”, Pearson Education.


MCA-14-23                      PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)                                               Time: 3 hours

 

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT – I

 

Preliminaries: History, Impact of Programming Paradigms, Role of Programming Languages, Good Language, Effects of Programming Environment, Translators and virtual architectures, Binding and Binding time, Language Syntax, Analysis of Program, Synthesis of Object program, Formal translation models: BNF Grammars, General parsing, Language translation, Recursive descent parsing.

UNIT – II

 

Formal languages and automata: The Chomsky hierarchy of formal languages, regular grammars, Regular expressions, Finite State Automata, Context-free grammars, Pushdown automata, Ambiguous grammars. Language Semantics: Attribute grammars, Denotational semantics, Program verification and validation, Data objects, variables, constants, data types, declaration, type checking, type casting, type promotion, Enumerators, Composite data types.

 

UNIT – III

 

Object Orientated concepts: Structured data types, Abstract data types, Information hiding, Subprogram concepts, Good program design, Type definitions, Type equivalence, Inheritance, Derived classes, Abstract classes, Polymorphism, Inheritance and software reuse.

 

Sequence control: Implicit and explicit sequence control, Sequence control within arithmetic expressions, sequence control between statements, sequencing with non-arithmetic expressions, Subprogram Sequence control.

 

UNIT – IV

 

Miscellaneous topics: Parameter passing techniques, Static & Dynamic Scoping, Storage of variables, Static storage, Heap Storage management, Distributed Processing, Exceptions and Exception handlers, Coroutines, Scheduled subprograms, Parallel programming, Processor design, Hardware and Software architectures, Network Programming, Evolution of scripting languages, Applets, XML.

 

Text Books:

 

1.    Pratt T.W., Zelkowitz M.V., Gopal T.V., “Programming Languages Design and Implementation”, Pearson Education.

 

2.    Sebesta W. Robert, “Concepts of Programming Languages”, Pearson Education.

 

Reference Books:

 

1.    Appleby Doris & VandeKopple J. Julius, “Programming languages-Paradigm and practice”, Tata McGraw Hill.

 

2.    Sethi Ravi, “Programming languages”, Pearson Education

 

3.    Scott M., “Programming Language Pragmatics”, Elsevier India.


MCA-14-24                     DATA STRUCTURES

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)                                               Time: 3 hours

 

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT – I

 

Introduction to Data Structures: Classification of Data Structures, Complexity of Algorithms, Asymptotic Notations, Abstract Data Types, Arrays, Representation of Arrays in memory, Operations on Array, Strings, Pointers, Sparse Matrices, Applications.

 

UNIT – II

 

Stacks & Queues: Representation of Stacks, Stack Operations, Applications, Queues, Operations on Queues, Circular Queues, Dequeue, Priority Queues, Applications.

 

Linked Lists: Introduction, Types, Operations (Insertion, Deletion, Traversal, Searching, Sorting), Applications, Dynamic Memory Management, Implementation of Linked Representations.

 

UNIT – III

 

Trees: Definition and Basic Terminologies, Representation of Trees, Binary Trees, Types of Tree, Representation of Binary Trees, Binary Tree Traversals, Threaded Binary Trees, Binary Search Trees and Operations, Minimum Spanning Tree, AVL Trees, Heap, m-way Search Trees, B-Trees, B+ Trees, Applications.

 

Advanced Trees: Introduction to 2-3 Tree, Red-black Tree, Splay Trees.

 

UNIT – IV

 

Graphs: Definitions and Basic Terminologies, Representation of Graphs, Graph Traversals, Shortest Path Problem, Applications.

 

Sorting and Searching: Recursive Binary Search, Types of Sorting, Implementation of Different Sorting Techniques: Selection Sort, Insertion Sort, Merge Sort, Radix Sort.

 

Hashing & Collision handling.

 

Text Books:

 

1.    G.A.V Pai, “Data Structures and Algorithms”, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi.

 

2.    Drozdek, “Data Structure and Algorithms in C++”, Cengage Learning.

 

Reference Books:

 

1.    Trembley, J.P. And Sorenson P.G., “An Introduction to Data Structures With Applications”, Tata McGraw- Hill.

 

2.    Seymour Lipschutz, “Data Structures”, Tata McGraw-Hill, Schaum’s Outlines, New Delhi.

 

3.    Weiss, “Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C++”, Pearson Education.

 

4.    Goodrich, “Data Structures & Algorithms in C++”, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.


 

MCA-14-25                      WEB TECHNOLOGIES

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)                                                 Time: 3 hours

 

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT – I

 

Introduction to Web Engineering: Categories and Characteristics of Web Applications, Web Applications Vs Conventional Software, Need for an Engineering Approach.

 

Web Essentials: The Internet, Basic Internet Protocols, WWW, HTTP (Structure of Request and Response Messages), Web Browser and its functions, URL, Web Servers and their features, Defining Virtual Hosts, Secure Servers.

 

UNIT – II

 

MarkUp Languages: Introduction to HTML, Characteristics, XHTML Syntax and Semantics, Fundamental HTML Elements, Lists, Tables, Frames, Forms, XHTML Abstract Syntax, Creating HTML Pages.

 

Cascading Style Sheets: Features, Core Syntax, Types, Style Sheets and HTML, Style Rule Cascading and Inheritance, Text Properties, CSS Box Model, Normal Flow Box Layout, Positioning and other useful Style Properties.

 

UNIT – III

 

Client–Side Programming: Introduction to JavaScript, Perspective, Basic Syntax, Variables and Data types, Statements, Operators, Literals, Functions, Objects, Arrays, Built-in Objects, Debuggers.

 

Server-Side Programming: Servlet Architecture, Generating Dynamic Content, Servlet Life Cycle, Sessions, Cookies, URL Rewriting, Servlet Capabilities, Servlets and Concurrency.

 

UNIT – IV

 

XML: Relation between XML, HTML, SGML, Goals of XML, Structure and Syntax of XML, Well Formed XML, DTD and its Structure, Namespaces and Data Typing in XML, Transforming XML Documents, XPATH, Template based Transformations, Linking with XML, Displaying XML documents in Browsers.

 

Text Books:

 

2.    Andrew King, “Website Optimization”, Shroff Publishers, India.

 

3.    Achyut Godbole, “Web Technologies”, Tata McGraw Hill, India.

 

Reference Books:

 

1.    Jeffrey C. Jackson, “Web Technologies”, Pearson Education, India.

 

2.    Thomas Powell, “The Complete Reference HTML”, Tata McGraw Hill, India.

 

3.    William Pardi, “XML in Action”, IT Professional, New York, USA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-31                    OBJECT ORIENTED ANALYSIS AND DESIGN USING UML

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)                                                      Time: 3 hours

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT – I

 

UML: Principles of modeling, UML Things – Structural, Behavioral, Grouping, Annotational. Relationships in UML – Dependency, Association, Generalization, Realization. Overview of diagrams in UML – Class diagram, Object diagram, Use-Case diagram, Sequence diagram, Collaboration diagram, Statechart diagram, Activity diagram, Component diagram, Deployment diagram. UML Semantic Rules – Names, Scope, Visibility, Integrity, Execution. Mechanisms in the UML – Specifications, Adornments, Common Divisions, Extensibility Mechanisms.

UNIT – II

 

Modeling as a Design Technique: Abstraction, Encapsulation, Modularity, Hierarchy, Typing, Concurrency, Persistence of objects. Purpose of modeling,

 

Class Model – Object & Class, Links & Associations, Generalization & Inheritance, Association Ends - Multiplicity, Role names, Ordering, Qualification, Aggregation, Link attributes & Link class, Abstract class, Metadata, Constraints. Constructing class diagram.

 

UNIT – III

 

State Modeling: Event, State, Activity, Action, Transitions & Conditions, State diagrams, Nested state diagrams, signal generalization, concurrency, relationships between class and state models.

 

Interaction Modeling: use case models, use case relationships, sequence models, procedural sequence models, activity models, special constructs for activity models.

 

UNIT – IV

 

System Analysis & design: System development stages, system conception, analysis, domain class model, domain state model, iterating the analysis.

 

Application interaction model, application class model, application state model, adding operations

 

System Design: estimating performance, make a reuse plan, organize the system into subsystem, identifying concurrency, allocating subsystems to processors and tasks, management of data stores, handling global resources, choosing software control strategies, handling boundary conditions, setting trade-off priorities, selecting an architect style.

Class Design: bridging gap, realize use cases with operations, designing algorithms, design optimization, adjustment of inheritance, organize classes & associations.

 

Text Books:

 

3.      Grady Booch, James Rumbaugh, Ivar Jacobson, The Unified Modeling Language User Guide, Pearson education, 2007

4.      M. Blaha, J. Rumbaugh, Object-Oriented Modeling and Design with UML, Pearson Education-2007

 

Reference Books:

 

5.      J. Rumbaugh, M. Blaha, W. Premerlani, F. Eddy, W. Lorensen, Object-Oriented Modeling and Design, Prentice Hall of India-1998

6.      Satzinger, Jackson, Burd, Object-Oriented Analysis & Design with the Unified Process, Thomson-2007

7.      Grady Booch, Object Oriented Analysis & Design, Addison Wesley-1994


MCA-14-32

COMPUTER NETWORKS AND DATA COMMUNICATION

Maximum marks: 100

(External: 80, Internal: 20)

Time: 3 hours

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT – I

 

Introduction to Computer Networks and its uses; Network categorization and Hardware; Topologies; Network Software: Protocols, Services, Network Architecture, Design issues for the layers, OSI Reference model, TCP/IP Reference model, Comparison of OSI and TCP/IP Models. Introduction to Example Networks: Internet, ISDN, X.25, Frame Relay, ATM.

UNIT – II

 

Data Communication Model, Digital and Analog data and signals, Asynchronous and Synchronous transmission; bit rate, baud, bandwidth, Transmission impairment; Channel Capacity; Guided Transmission Media; Wireless transmission; Satellite communication.

 

Switching; Multiplexing; Spread Spectrum; local loop; Modems and ADSL; Encoding: NRZ, NRZ-I, Manchester and Differential Manchester encoding; Internet over Cable; ADSL Versus Cable; The Mobile Telephone System;

 

UNIT – III

 

Data Link Layer Design issues; Framing, Error Detection and Correction; Flow Control: Sliding Window Protocols; Medium Access Control: Aloha, CSMA protocols, Collision free protocols, Limited Contention Protocols; Wavelength Division Multiple access protocol, Wireless LAN Protocol: MACA; High Speed LANs; Ethernet LAN, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet; Binary Exponential Backoff algorithm; Token Ring and FDDI; Introduction to Wireless LANs;

 

UNIT – IV

 

Network Layer Design issues , Virtual Circuit and Datagram Subnet, Routing Algorithms: Optimality principle, Shortest path Routing, Flooding , Distance Vector Routing, Link State Routing, Hierarchical Routing, Broadcast and Multi Cast Routing, Routing for Mobile hosts, Congestion Control Algorithms: General Principals; Congestion control in Virtual – Circuit Subnets; Congestion Control in Datagram Subnets: Choke packets, Load Shedding; Random Early Detection, Jitter Control; Quality of Service: Over provisioning, Buffering, Traffic Shaping, Leaky bucket, token bucket, Resource Reservation, Admission Control, Packet Scheduling;

 

Text Books:

1.

Andrew S. Tanenbaum, Computer Networks, 4th Edition - PHI.

2.

Behrouz A Forouzan, Data  Communications  and  Networking , 5th Edition- Tata Mc-Graw Hill.

Reference Books:

3.      Michael A. Gallo, William M. Hancock, Computer Communications and Networking Technologies – CENGAGE learning.

 

4.      William Stallings, Data and Computer Communications, 5th Edition – PHI.


MCA-14-33                     DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)                                                      Time: 3 hours

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT – I

 

Introduction: Algorithms, Role of algorithms in computing, Complexity of algorithms, Analyzing algorithms, designing algorithms, asymptotic notations.

 

Divide and Conquer: Complexity of iterative programs and recursive programs, solving recurrence equations: back substitution method, recursion tree method, masters theorem.

Analysis of heap sort and quick sort; Counting sort, Radix sort, Bucket sort, Lower bounds for sorting.

 

UNIT – II

 

Hash Tables, Hash functions, Collision handling in hashing, analyzing various operations on Binary search tree. Introduction to Red-black trees.

Dynamic Programming (DP): Elements of DP, Matrix chain multiplication, Longest common subsequence, optimal binary search trees.

UNIT – III

 

Greedy Techniques (GT): Elements of GT, Activity selection problem, Huffman codes, Knapsack Problem. Graph Algorithms: Single source shortest path: Analysis of Dijkstra’s Algorithm, Limitations of Dijkstra’s Algorithm, Negative weight cycle, Bellman-Ford algorithm. All Pairs Shortest Path: Relation of Shortest path and matrix multiplication, Analysis of Floyd Warshall algorithm. Maximum Flow: Flow network, Ford-Fulkerson method.

 

UNIT – IV

 

Strings: Storage of strings, naive string-matching algorithm, Rabin-Karp string matching algorithm. Computational complexity: Notion of Polynomial time algorithms, Complexity classes: P, NP, NP-Hard and NP-Complete, Polynomial time verification, Reducibility, NP-Completeness, Examples of NP-Complete and NP-Hard problems: Traveling Salesman Problem, Knapsack, Bin Packing, Satisfiability, Vertex Cover, Clique, Independent Set. Introduction to approximation algorithms.

 

Text Books:

 

5.                  Cormen, Leiserson, Rivest, “Introduction to Algorithms”, PHI India.

 

6.                  Neapolitan R., “Foundations of Algorithms”, Jones and Bartlett Learning.

 

Reference Books:

 

3.            Cooper A., “Computability Theory”, Chapman and Hall/ CRC Press.

 

4.            Robert Sedgewick, “Algorithms in C”, Pearson Education India.

5.            Steven Skiena, “The Algorithm Design Manual”, Springer India.

 

6.            Reiter, Johnson, “Limits of Computation”, Chapman and Hall/ CRC Press.


MCA-14-34

DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Maximum marks: 100 (External:

80, Internal: 20)

Time: 3 hours

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

UNIT – I

 

Basic Concepts: File Systems vs. DMBS, Characteristics of the Data Base Approach, Abstraction and Data Integration, Database users, Advantages and Disadvantages of a DBMS.

 

Data Base Systems Concepts and Architecture: Schema and Instances, DBMS architecture and Data Independence, Data Base languages and Interfaces, DBMS functions and component modules.

Entity Relationship Model: Entity Types, Entity Sets, Attributes & keys, Relationships, Relationships Types, Roles and Structural Constraints, Design issues, E-R Diagrams, Design of an E-R Database Schema, Reduction of an E-R schema to Tables.

Relational Data Model: Relational model concepts, Integrity constraints over Relations, Relational Algebra

 

– Basic Operations.

 

UNIT – II

 

SQL: Data Definition and Data Types, Components of SQL: DDL, DML, and DCL, Schema Change Statement in SQL, Views& Queries in SQL, Specifying Constraints & Indexes in SQL, Additional Features of SQL.

 

Relational Data Base Management System: ORACLE/MySQL, Basic structure, Date Base Structure & its manipulation in ORACLE/MySQL, Storage Organization in ORACLE/MySQL.

Conventional Data Models: An overview of Network and Hierarchical Data Models.

 

UNIT – III

 

Relational Data Base Design: Functional Dependencies, Decomposition, Normal forms based on primary keys (1 NF, 2 NF, 3 NF, & BCNF), Multi-valued Dependencies, 4 NF, Join dependencies, 5 NF, Domain key normal form.

 

Practical Data Base Design: Role of Information systems in Organizations, Database design process, physical database design in Relational Database.

UNIT – IV

 

Transaction Processing Concepts: Introduction to Transaction Processing, Transaction & System Concepts, Properties of Transaction, Schedules and Recoverability, Serializability of Schedules.

 

Concurrency Control Techniques: Locking Techniques, Time stamp ordering, Multi-version Techniques, Optimistic Techniques, Granularity of Data items.

 

Recovery Techniques: Recovery concepts, Recovery Techniques in centralized DBMS. Data Base Security: Introduction to Data base Security issues.

 

Text Books:

5.                  Elmasri & Navathe: Fundamentals of Database systems, 5th edition, Pearson Education.

6.                  Thomas Connolly Carolyn Begg: Database Systems, 3/e, Pearson Education.

Reference Books:

3.                  Korth & Silberschatz: Database System Concept, 4th Edition, McGraw Hill International Edition.

4.                  Raghu Ramakrishnan & Johannes Gehrke: Database Management Systems, 2nd edition, Mcgraw Hill International Edition.

5.                  Peter Rob, Carlos Colonel: Database system Design, Implementation, and Measurement, Cengage Learning, 2nd Ed.

6.                  Database Systems: A practical Approach to Design, Implementation and Management, Pearson Education- 3e

 

7.                  C.J. Date: An Introduction to Data Bases Systems 7th Edition, Addison Wesley N. Delhi.

8.                  Bipin C. Desai: An Introduction to Database System, Galgotia Publication, N. Delhi.

9.                  Abbey, Abramson & Corey: Oracle 8i-A Beginner’s Guide, Tata McGraw Hill.

 

10.              Ivan Bayross: SQL, PL/SQL- The Program Language of ORACLE, BPB Publication.

11.              RUSSELL DYER, MYSQL IN A NUTSHELL


MCA-14-35                     OPERATING SYSTEMS

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)                                                      Time: 3 hours

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT – I

 

Introductory Concepts: Operating system functions, structure, types viz. distributed systems, special-purpose systems, open-source operating systems; Operating system services, system calls, system programs.

 

CPU Scheduling: Process concepts, process operations, inter-process communication, scheduling criteria, scheduling algorithms, Comparative study of scheduling algorithms, Multiple processor scheduling.

 

UNIT – II

 

Concurrent Processes: Critical section problem, Semaphores, Classical process co-ordination problems and their solutions, monitors, synchronization examples.

Deadlocks: Deadlock characterization, Deadlock prevention and avoidance, Deadlock detection and recovery.

UNIT – III

 

Memory Management: Swapping, Paging, Segmentation, Virtual memory concepts: Demand Paging, Page replacement Algorithms, Thrashing.

 

Storage Management: File concepts, File access and allocation methods, File-system mounting, sharing, protection, structure and implementation. Directory Systems: Structured Organizations, directory protection mechanisms, recovery. Disk scheduling.

 

UNIT – IV

 

Protection & Security: Goals & principles of protection, domains of protection, access matrix, access controls. Security: Security problem, threats, security tools, classification.

Distributed Systems: Types of network-based OS, Network structure and topologies, Communication structure & Protocol, design issues. Distributed File-system: Remote file access, File replication, examples. Distributed synchronization: Mutual exclusion, Concurrency control, deadlock handling.

 

Text Books:

 

4.  Silberschatz A., Galvin P.B.,and Gagne G., Operating System Concepts, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.

 

5.  Godbole, A.S. Operating Systems, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi.

6. Tanenbaum, A.S., Operating System- Design and Implementation, Prentice Hall of India.

 

Reference Books:

 

3.      Deitel, H.M., Operating Systems, Addison- Wesley Publishing Company, New York.

 

4.      Stalings William, Operating System, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi.


MCA-14-41                     PROGRAMMING IN JAVA

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)                                                      Time: 3 hours

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT – I

 

Features of Java, Data types, operators & expressions, control structures, arrays, Classes, objects & methods, constructors, garbage collection, access qualifiers, string handling – string operations, character extraction, string comparison, searching and modifying strings, StringBuffer, packages and interfaces, Wrapper classes.

 

 

UNIT – II

 

Inheritance: single and multilevel inheritance, method overriding, abstract class, use of super and final keywords.

Exception Handling: Exception types, uncaught exceptions, multiple catch clauses, nested try statements, built-in exceptions, creating your own exceptions.

Multithreading: Java thread model, creating multiple threads, thread priorities, synchronization, interthread communication, suspending, resuming and stopping threads.

 

UNIT – III

 

Applets: Local & Remote Applets, Applet Architecture, Passing Parameters to Applets, Applet Graphics, Adapter Class.

 

I/O Streams: Console I/O – reading console input, writing console output, Files I/O – Byte Streams, Character Streams, Collection Interfaces & Classes, Delegation Event Model

 

UNIT – IV

 

AWT Classes: Window fundamentals, working with graphics, working with color & fonts. AWT controls, layout managers & working with menus, JFrames.

 

Swing Classes, Java Beans, Servlet classes & Life Cycle.

 

Text Books:

 

4.      Herbert Schildt, The Complete Reference Java 2, Fourth Edition, Tata McGraw Hill-2001

 

5.      Liang Y.Daniel, Introduction to Java Programming (7th Edition), 2009, Pearson Education.

 

Reference Books:

 

3.      Steven Holzner, Java 1.2, BPB-1998

 

4.      E. Balaguruswami, Programming with Java - Second Edition, Tata McGraw Hill-1998.

 

5.      Mughal K.A., Rasmussen R.W., A Programmer’s Guide to Java Certification, Addison-Wesley, 2000


MCA-14-42                     ADVANCED COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)                                                      Time: 3 hours

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT – I

 

Computational Model: Basic computational models, evolution and interpretation of computer architecture, concept of computer architecture as a multilevel hierarchical framework. Classification of parallel architectures, Relationships between programming languages and parallel architectures

 

Parallel Processing:: Types and levels of parallelism, Instruction Level Parallel (ILP) processors, dependencies between instructions, principle and general structure of pipelines, performance measures of pipeline, pipelined processing of integer, Boolean, load and store instructions, VLIW architecture, Code Scheduling for ILP-Processors - Basic block scheduling, loop scheduling, global scheduling

 

UNIT – II

 

Superscalar Processors: Emergence of superscalar processors, Tasks of superscalar processing – parallel decoding, superscalar instruction issue, shelving, register renaming, parallel execution, preserving sequential consistency of instruction execution and exception processing, comparison of VLIW & superscalar processors

 

Branch Handling: Branch problem, Approaches to branch handling – delayed branching, branch detection and prediction schemes, branch penalties and schemes to reduce them, multiway branches, guarded execution

 

UNIT – III

 

MIMD Architectures: Concepts of distributed and shared memory MIMD architectures, UMA, NUMA, CC-NUMA & COMA models, problems of scalable computers.

Direct Interconnection Networks: Linear array, ring, chordal rings, star, tree, 2D mesh, barrel shifter, hypercubes.

UNIT – IV

 

Dynamic interconnection networks: single shared buses, comparison of bandwidths of locked, pended & split transaction buses, arbiter logics, crossbar, multistage networks – omega, butterfly

 

Cache coherence problem, hardware based protocols – snoopy cache protocol, directory schemes, hierarchical cache coherence protocols, software based protocols.

 

Text Books:

 

3.      Sima, Fountain, Kacsuk, Advanced Computer Architecture, Pearson Education, 2006.

 

4.      D. A. Patterson and J. L. Hennessey, Computer Architecture – A Quantitative Approach, Fifth Edition, Morgan Kaufmann, 2012.

 

Reference Books:

 

3.      Kai Hwang, Advanced Computer Architecture, Tata McGraw Hill, 2005

4.      Nicholas Carter, Computer Architecture, McGraw Hill, 2006

 

5.      Harry F. Jordan, Gita Alaghband, Fundamentals of Parallel Processing, Pearson Education, 2003.


MCA-14-43                     DATA WAREHOUSING AND MINING

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)                                                      Time: 3 hours

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT – I

 

Data Warehouse: Basic concepts, The Data Warehouse - A Brief History, Characteristics, Difference between Operational Database Systems and Data Warehouse, Architecture for a Data Warehouse, Fact and Dimension Tables, Data Warehouse Schemas, Data Cube : A Multidimensional Data Model, Data Cube Computation Methods, Typical OLAP Operations, Data Warehouse Design and Usage, Data Warehouse Implementation, Data Generalization by Attribute Oriented Induction.

 

UNIT – II

 

Data Mining: Introduction: Motivation, Importance, Knowledge Discovery Process, Data Mining Functionalities, Interesting Patterns, Classification of Data Mining Systems, Major issues, Data Objects and Attribute Types. Data Preprocessing: Overview, Data Cleaning, Data Integration, Data Reduction, Data Transformation and Data Discretization. Data Mining Models: Directed Data Mining Models, Directed Data Mining Methodology. Data Visualization. Outliers, Types of Outliers and Challenges of Outlier Detection.

 

UNIT – III

 

Data Mining Classical Techniques: Statistics – Similarity Models, Steps for Designing Similarity Models, Table Lookup Model. Clustering- Requirement for Cluster Analysis, Clustering Methods- Partitioning Methods, Hierarchical Methods, Density-Based Methods, Grid-Based Methods, Evaluation of Clustering. Nearest Neighborhood- Memory Based Reasoning, Challenges of Memory Based Reasoning,

UNIT – IV

 

Data Mining Next Generation Techniques: Decision Tree- Decision Tree Induction, Attribute Selection Measures, Tree Pruning. Association Rule Mining- Market Basket Analysis, Frequent Itemset Mining using Apriori Algorithm, Improving the Efficiency of Apriori, Neural Network- Bayesian Belief Networks, Classification by Backpropagation. Data Mining Applications, Data Mining Trends and Tools.

 

Reference Books:

 

6.  J Hanes, M. Kamber, “Data Mining Concepts and Techniques”, Elsevier India.

 

7.  G.S. Linoff, M.J.A. Berry, “Data Mining Techniques”, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.

 

3. A. Berson, S.J. Smith, “Data Warehousing, Data Mining & OLAP”, Tata McGraw-                Hill.


MCA-14-44                     COMPUTER GRAPHICS

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)                                                      Time: 3 hours

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT – I

 

Introduction to Computer Graphics and its applications, Components and working of Interactive Graphics; Video Display Devices: Raster scan and Random Scan displays, Display Processors; Resolution, Aspect Ratio, Refresh CRT, interlacing; Color CRT monitors, LookUp tables, Plasma Panel and LCD monitors, Interactive Input and Output Devices: keyboard, mouse, trackball, joystick, light pen, digitizers; image scanners, Touch Panels; Voice systems; printers, plotters; Graphics Software; Coordinate Representations;

 

UNIT – II

 

Drawing Geometry: Symmetrical and Simple DDA line drawing algorithm, Bresenham’s line Algorithm; loading frame buffer; Symmetrical DDA for drawing circle, Polynomial method for circle drawing; circle drawing using polar coordinates, Bresenham’s circle drawing; Generation of ellipse; parametric representation of cubic curves, drawing Bezier curves;

Filled-Area Primitives: Flood fill algorithm, Boundary fill algorithm, Scan-line polygon fill algorithm

 

UNIT – III

 

2-D Transformations: translation, rotation, scaling, matrix representations and homogeneous coordinates, composite transformations, general pivot point rotation, general fixed point scaling, Shearing; Reflection ; Reflection about an arbitrary line;

 

2-D Viewing: window, viewport; 2-D viewing transformation, zooming, panning; Clipping operations: point and line clipping, Cohen-Sutherland line clipping, mid-point subdivision line clipping, Liang-Barsky line clipping, Sutherland-Hodgman polygon clipping; Weiler-Atherton polygon Clipping

Pointing and positioning techniques; rubber band technique; dragging;

 

UNIT – IV

 

3-D Graphics: 3-D modeling of objects, 3D transformation matrices for translation, scaling and rotation, parallel projection: Orthographic and oblique projection; perspective projection; Hidden surface removal: Z-buffer, depth-sorting, area subdivision, BSP-Tree method; Ray casting;

 

Shading: Modelling light intensities, Gouraud shading, Phong shading; Introduction to Animation, Tweening, Morphing, Fractals;

 

Text Books:

 

3.  Donald Hearn, M. Pauline Baker, Computer Graphics, Pearson Education.

 

4.  Foley etc., Computer Graphics Principles & Practice, Pearson Education.

 

Reference Books:

 

4.      D.P. Mukherjee, Fundamentals of Computer Graphics and Multimedia, PHI.

 

5.      Newmann & Sproull, Principles of Interactive Computer Graphics, McGraw Hill.

 

6.      Rogers, Procedural Elements of Computer Graphics, McGraw Hill.

 

7.      Anirban Mukhopadhyay, Arup Chattopadhyay, Introduction to Computer Graphics and Multimedia, Vikas Publications.

8.      Zhigang Xiang, Roy Plastock, Computer Graphics, Tata McGraw Hill.

 

9.      Apurva A. Desai, Computer Graphics, PHI.

 

10.  Malay K. Pakhira, Computer Graphics, Multimedia and Animation, PHI


MCA-14-45(I)               INFORMATION SECURITY

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)                                                      Time: 3 hours

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT – I

 

Information Security Concepts: Background and Current Scenario, Types of Attacks, Goals for Security. Security Threats and Vulnerabilities: Overview of Security threats, Weak / Strong Passwords and Password Cracking, Insecure Network connections, Malicious Code, Programming Bugs . Wireless Networks and Security: Components of wireless networks, Security issues in wireless

UNIT – II

 

Basic encryption and decryption, Applications of Cryptography, Encryption techniques, Characteristics of good encryption systems, Secret key cryptography, Digital Signatures, Data Encryption Standard, International Data Encryption Algorithm, Advanced Encryption Standard, Hash and MAC algorithms.

 

UNIT – III

 

Secure sockets, IPsec overview, IP security architecture, IPSec-Internet Key, Exchanging(IKE), IKE phases encoding, Internet security, Threats to privacy, Packet sniffing, Spoofing , Web security requirements, Real Time communication security, Security standards–Kerberos.X.509AuthenticationService.

 

UNIT – IV

 

Security protocols, Transport layer protocols, Electronic mail security, PEM and S/MIME security protocol, Pretty Good Privacy, Web Security, Firewalls design principle, Trusted systems, Electronic payment protocols. Intrusion Detection, Password Management, Viruses and related Threats – Virus Counter measures, Virtual Private Networks.

 

Reference Books:

 

3.  William Stallings, “Cryptography and Network Security: Principles and Standards”, Prentice Hall India.

 

4.  Edward Amoroso, "Fundamentals of Computer Security Technology", Prentice-Hall, 1999

3. William Stallings, "Network Security Essentials", 3rd Edition, Pearson Education,  2006.

4. Bruce Schneier, “Applied Cryptography: Protocols, Algorithms, and Source Code in  C”, Wiley India Pvt.

 

Ltd.


MCA-14-45(II)                             ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)                                                      Time: 3 hours

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT-I

 

Introduction: Background and history, Overview of AI applications areas.

The predicate calculus: Syntax and semantic for propositional logic and FOPL, Clausal form, inference rules, resolution and unification.

Knowledge representation: Network representation-Associative network & conceptual graphs, Structured representation- Frames & Scripts.

 

UNIT-II

 

Search strategies: Strategies for state space search-data driven and goal driven search; Search algorithms-uninformed search (depth first, breadth first, depth first with iterative deepening) and informed search (Hill climbing, best first, A* algorithm, mini-max etc.), computational complexity, Properties of search algorithms - Admissibility, Monotonicity, Optimality, Dominance.

UNIT-III

 

Production system: Types of production system-commutative and non-commutative production systems, Decomposable and non-decomposable production systems, Control of search in production systems.

Rule  based expert systems: Architecture,

development,

managing uncertainty

in  expert  systems -

Bayesian probability  theory, Stanford  certainty factor

algebra,  Nonmonotonic

logic  and reasoning

with beliefs, Fuzzy logic, Dempster/Shaffer

and other approaches to uncertainty.

 

UNIT-IV

 

Knowledge acquisition: Types of learning, learning by automata, genetic algorithms, intelligent editors, learning by induction.

 

Natural Language Processing (NLP): Problems in understanding natural languages, Different stages of language analysis, Chomsky Hierarchy of formal languages, Transition network parsers (TNP), Augmented Transition network parsers (ATNP).

 

Text Books:

 

1.

George  F. Luger, Artificial Intelligence, Pearson Education.

2.

Dan W. Patterson Introduction to Artificial Intelligence and Expert system, PHI.

 

Reference Books:

 

5.      Ben Coppin, Artificial Intelligence Illuminated, Narosa Publishing House.

 

6.      Eugene Charniak, Drew McDermott Introduction to Artificial Intelligence, Pearson Education.

 

7.      Nils J. Nilsson Principles of Artificial Intelligence, Narosa Publishing House.

 

4.    Jackson Peter, Introduction to Expert systems, 3rd  ed., Pearson-Education.


MCA-14-45(III)                           INFORMATION SYSTEMS

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)                                                      Time: 3 hours

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT – I

 

Fundamental of Management Information systems: The Fundamental Roles of Information System in business, Trends in Information Systems, Types of Information Systems, Managerial Challenges of Information Technology.

 

The Components of Information Systems: System Concept, Components of an Information System, Information System Resources, Information System Activities, Recognizing Information Systems

UNIT – II

 

IT Infrastructure and Emerging Technologies: - IT Infrastructure, Infrastructure Components, Software/Hardware Platform Trends and Emerging Technologies, Management Issues.

Foundation of Business Intelligence: Databases and Information Management: Organizing Data in a Traditional File Environment, The Database Approach to Data Management, Using Database to Improve Business Performance and Decision Making, Managing Data Resources.

 

UNIT – III

 

Securing Information Systems: - System Vulnerability and Abuse, Business Value of Security and Control, Establishing a Framework for Security and Control, Technologies and Tools for Security.

Key System Applications for the Digital Age

 

Enterprise Applications: - Enterprise Systems, Supply Chain Management Systems, Customer Relationship Management Systems, Enterprise Applications: New Opportunities and Challenges.

 

UNIT – IV

 

Managing Knowledge: - The Knowledge Management Landscape, Enterprises-Wide Knowledge Management Systems, Knowledge Work Systems, Intelligent Techniques.

Enhancing Decision Making: - Decision Making and Information Systems, Systems for Decision Support, Executive Support Systems (ESS), Group Decision-Support Systems (GDSS).

 

Text Books:

 

1.           Kenneth C.Laudon, Jane P.Laudon, Management Information Systems Managing the Digital Firm, 10th Edition, Pearson Education.

 

4.                  James A O’Brien, George M Marakas, Management Information Systems, 7th Edition, Tata McGraw-Hill.

 

Reference Books:

 

4.      Laudon & Laudon, Essentials of Management Information Systems, 8/e Pearson Education.

 

5.      McLeod & Schell, Management Information Systems, 10/e, Pearson Education.

6.      Rahmatian, Management Information Systems: Learning Exercises and Applications, 1/e Pearson Education.

7.      Jawadekar, W.S., Management Information Systems, 2/e, Tata McGraw-Hill.

 

8.      Robert G.Mudrick, Coel E.Ross, James R.Claggett,Information Systems for Modern Management.

9.      James A.O'Brien, Management Information Systems.


MCA-14-45(IV)                           SECURITY IN COMPUTING

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)                                                      Time: 3 hours

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT – I

 

Computer Security Concepts, Threats, Attacks and Assets, Security Functional Requirements, Security Architecture and Scope of Computer Security, Computer Security Trends, Computer Security Strategies. Program Security: Secure Program, Non-malicious Program Error, Viruses and other Malicious Code, Targeted Malicious Code, Control against Program Threats.

UNIT – II

 

Database Security: Database Management System, Relational Databases, Database Access Control, Inference, Security Requirements, Reliability and Integrity, Sensitive Data, Database Encryption.

Network Security: Threats in Network, Network Security Controls, Firewall- Need for firewall, Characteristics, Types of firewall, Firewall Basing, Intrusion Detection System- Types, Goals of IDS, IDS strengths and Limitations.

 

UNIT – III

 

Internet Security Protocols and Standards: Secure Socket Layer (SSL) and Transport Layer Security (TLS), IPv4 and IPv6 Security, Kerberos 672, X.509 678, Public Key Infrastructure.

 

Linux Security Model, File System Security, Linux Vulnerability, Linux System Hardening, Application Security.

Window Security Architecture, Windows Vulnerability, Windows Security Defense, Browser Defenses.

 

UNIT – IV

 

Physical Security Threats, Physical Security Prevention and Mitigation Measures, Recovery form Physical Security Breaches, Security Auditing Architecture, Security Audit Trail, Security Risk assessment, Security Controls or Safeguard, IT Security Plan, Cybercrime and Computer Crime, Intellectual Property, Privacy, Ethical Issues.

 

Reference Books:

 

1.           Charles. P. Pfleeger & Shari Lawrence Pfleeger, Security in Computing, fourth edition, Pearson Education, 2006.ISBN: 978-81-317-2725-6.

 

2.                  William Stalling, Lawrie Brown, “Computer Security Principles and Practice”, First edition, Pearson Education, 2010. ISBN: 978-81-317-3351-6.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MCA-14-51      COMPILER DESIGN

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)                                                  Time: 3 hours

 

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

Unit – I

 

Compilers and Translators, Need of Translators, Tools used for compilation, Structure and Phases of Compiler, Single-Pass and Multi-Pass Compilers, Bootstrapping, Compiler Construction Tools. Bootstrap compilers, Phases of Compilation process.

 

Lexical Analysis: Design, Finite Automata and Regular Expressions, LEX package on LINUX systems. Process of Lexical Analysis, Recognition of Regular Expressions.

Unit – II

 

Syntax-Directed Translation: Translation Schemes, Implementation, Postfix Notation, Parse Trees and Syntax Trees, Three-address code and representations, Flow of Control. Building Symbol Tables, Data Structures for symbol table, representing scope information.

 

Run Time Storage Administration: Types of Storage Allocation Schemes, Implementation of Stack Allocation Scheme and Implementation of Block Structured Languages.

Error Detection and Recovery: Errors, Lexical-Phase Errors, Syntactic Phase Errors, Semantic Errors.

 

Unit – III

 

Parsing Techniques: Top down & Bottom-up parsing, Shift Reduce parsing, Operator Precedence parsing, Predictive Parsers. Left Recursion and its removal, Recursive Descent parser, LR parsers, Canonical Collection of LR(0) and LR(1) items, SLR parsing tables, Canonical LR parsing tables, LALR parsing tables, Parsing Ambiguous Grammars, Implementation of LR parsing tables, LL(k) and LR(k) Parsers, YACC package on LINUX systems.

 

Unit – IV

 

Intermediate Code Generation: Need, Issues in the design of a code generator, Intermediate languages, Quadruples, Register Allocation and Assignment statement, peephole optimization.

 

Code Optimization: Principle sources of Optimization, optimization of basic blocks, Loop Optimizations, DAG Representation of Basic Blocks, Loop Invariant Computation, Reducible Flow Graphs, Global Data Flow Analysis, code improving transformation.

 

Text Books

 

5.  Alfred V Aho, “Principles of Compiler Design, Narosa Publishing House.

 

6.  Jean Paul Tremblay and Sorenson, “The Theory and Practice of Compiler Writing”, McGraw Hill.

 

Reference Books:

 

8.  Dhamdhere D.M, System programming and operating system, McGraw Hill.

 

9.  Beck L. Leland, System Software, Pearson Education.

 

10.              Aho, Sethi, & Ullman, Compilers Principles, Techniques and Tools, Pearson Education.

 

11.              Fischer, “Crafting a compiler in C”, Pearson Education.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2


MCA-14-52

ADVANCED WEB TECHNOLOGY

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)

Time: 3 hours

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

UNIT – I

 

Introduction: DNS caching and prefetching, CSS Expressions and performance, Buffering, Weblog. Search Engines: Searching techniques used by search engines, keywords, advertisements, Search Engine Optimization (SEO) for individual web pages: header entries, selection of URL, SEO for entire website: Hyperlinks and link structure, page rank of Google, robots,

 

Pitfalls in Optimization: optimization and testing, keyword density, duplicate contents, broken links, poor readability, navigation styles; tools for optimization: etracking, Google analytics.

 

UNIT – II

 

PHP: Introduction, Variables, Data Types, Operators and Expressions, Control Flow; Functions; Code Blocks and Browser Output, Objects, String Manipulation and Regular Expressions, Authentication with PHP, Interaction with File System and Server, Form processing, Session Management, cookies, generating dynamic contents with MySQL.

 

UNIT – III

 

Advanced Development: Object oriented JavaScript, callbacks, closures, modules, AJAX, JQuery: Introduction, Traversing and Working with DOM, Listening to DOM events, Styling. Angular.js: Introduction, Directives, Forms, Services, MVC development.

 

UNIT – IV

 

Optimization: Optimizing images, Load balancers, Tuning MYSQL, query caching, query execution and optimization, traffic generation.

 

Security: Introduction, Handling user access and user input, Bypassing client-side controls, Authentication, Session management and Session hijacking, Attacks on data stores: SQL query log, SQL injections; Attacks on Users: XSS attacks; Cross-site Request Forgery (CXRF), Dos and DDos attacks, DNS hijacking.

 

Reference Books:

 

5.  Peter Smith, “Professional Website performance”, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.

 

6.  Deitel H.M., Deitel P.J., “Internet & World Wide Web: How to program”, Pearson Education.

 

7.  Kogent Learning, “Web Technologies: HTML, JavaScript, PHP, Java, JSP, XML, AJAX – Black Book”, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.

8.  Boronczyk, Naramore, “Beginning PHP, Apache, MySQL Web Development”, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.

 

9.  Stuttard D., Pinto M., “The Web Application Hackers Handbook”, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3


MCA-14-53

LINUX AND SHELL PROGRAMMING

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)

Time: 3 hours

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all.

Question Number

1 will consist of

 

objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT – I

 

Introduction: Basic features, architecture, distributions, Installation requirements; Kernel, Shell.

File System: boot block, super block, inode table, data blocks, accessing files, storage of files, standard directories, system calls for files, file and disk related commands, hard disk partitions; System startup and shut down processes, init and run levels, rc and init files.


 

UNIT – II

 

C language compiler, layout of C program in memory, images, managing zombie and orphan processes, use of loader, debugging with gdb.


process environment, kernel support, process makefiles, dependency calculations, dynamic


 

UNIT – III

 

User Management: Adding new users and groups, super users, creating and mounting file systems. User management commands.

 

Security and Connections: viewing and changing the permissions and ownerships of files and directories, creating networks, Signal generation and handling, Environment variables, Commands: man, ping, ifconfig, raise, alarm, pause, abort etc.

 

UNIT – IV

 

Shell: meaning, types; connecting processes with pipes, tee, redirect input and output, background processes, managing multiple processes, changing priority, scheduling of processes, at, batch and croncommands, process related commands, filters.

 

Shell Programming: Introduction, shell programming in various shells, file name substitution, read command, operators, conditional statements, looping and case statements, expr statement, command line arguments, parameter passing and arguments, associative arrays, string and mathematical functions, arrays and functions, libraries, shell variables, shell programs to automate system tasks, interrupt processing, shell scripts for administrators, debugging shell scripts.

 

Text Books:

7.  Matthew Neil, Stones Richjard, “Beginning Linux Programming”, 4th Ed., Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.

8.  John Goerzen, “Linux Programming Bible”, IDG Books, New Delhi.

 

Reference Books:

 

7.  Negus Christopher, “Linux Bible”, 8th Ed., Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.

 

8.  Petersen Richard, “Linux: The Complete Reference”, 6th Ed., Tata Mcgraw Hill.

 

9.  Venkateshmurthy M.G., “Introduction to Unix & Shell Programming”, Pearson Education.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4


MCA-14-54                      MOBILE APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT

 

Maximum marks: 100 (External: 80, Internal: 20)                                                  Time: 3 hours

Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all.        Question Number 1 will consist of

 

objective type/short-answer type questions covering the entire syllabus. In addition to question no. 1, the examiner is required to set eight more questions selecting two from each unit. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. All questions will carry equal marks.

 

UNIT – I

 

Introduction: Mobile Applications, Characteristics and Benefits, Application Model, Infrastructure and Managing Resources, Mobile Software Engineering, Frameworks and Tools, Mobile devices Profiles. Application Design: Memory Management, Design patterns for limited memory, Work flow for Application Development, Techniques for composing Applications, Dynamic Linking, Plug-ins and rules of thumb for using DLLs, Concurrency and Resource Management.

 

Development: Intents and Services, Storing and Retrieving data, Communication via the Web, Notification and Alarms, Graphics and Multimedia, Telephony, Location based services, Packaging and Deployment, Security and Hacking

 

UNIT-II

 

Google Android: Introduction, JDK & ADK, Android Application Architecture, Traditional Programming Model and Android, Activities, Intents, Tasks, Services; Runtime Environment for Applications, Callbacks and Override in application, Concurrency, Serialization, Application Signing, Publishing your application, API keys for Google Maps.

Android Framework: GUI and MVC Architecture, Fragments and Multi-platform development, Creating Widgets: Layouts, Canvas Drawing, Shadows, Gradients; Applications with multiple screens; Handling database in Android: Android Database class, Using the Database API.

 

UNIT-III

 

Android Applications: Working with Eclipse and Android, Various life cycles for applications, Building a User Interface: Blank UI, Folding and Unfolding a scalable UI, Making Activity, Fragment, Multiple layouts; Content Provider, Location and Mapping: location based services, Mapping, Google Maps activity, Working with MapView and MapActivity; Playing and Recording of Audio and Video in application; Sensors and Near Field Communication; Native libraries and headers, Building client server applications.

UNIT-IV

 

Other Platforms: Apple iPhone Platform, Introduction to iPhone OS and iOS,