MCA I and II Semester Syllabus (Non-CBCS) w.e.f. 2020-21

Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra

(Established by the State Legislature Act XII of 1956)

(‘A+’ Grade, NAAC Accredited)

||     योगस्थ:  कुरु कर्माणि     ||

समबुद्धि व योग  युक्त होकर कर्म करो

(Perform Actions while Stead fasting in the State of Yoga)

 

Scheme of Examination and Syllabus of

Master of Computer Application (MCA)(Non-CBCS) in Phased Manner

 

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE & APPLICATIONS

Non-CBCS CURRICULUM (2020-21)

Program Name: Master of Computer Applications (MCA)(Non-CBCS)

(For the Batches Admitted From 2020-2021)

KURUKSHETRA UNIVERSITY, KURUKSHETRA

 

SCHEME OF EXAMINATIONS

FOR

MASTER OF COMPUTER APPLICATIONS

(NON-CBCS)

(FOR INSTITUTES AFFILIATED TO KURUKSHETRA UNIVERSITY, KURUKSHETRA)

  1. E. F. ACADEMIC SESSION 2020-21 IN PHASED MANNER

Paper Code Nomenclature of Paper Workload Per Week (Hrs.) Exam Time (Hrs.) External Marks Internal Marks Total Marks Pass Marks
Max. Pass
First Semester
MCA-20-11 Programming in Java 4 3 75 30 25 100 40
MCA-20-12 Data Structures using C++ 4 3 75 30 25 100 40
MCA-20-13 Operating Systems 4 3 75 30 25 100 40
MCA-20-14 Data Communication and Computer Networks 4 3 75 30 25 100 40
MCA-20-15 Object-Oriented Analysis and Design using UML 4 3 75 30 25 100 40
MCA-20-16 S/W Lab – I Based on MCA-20-11 5 3 100 40 100 40
MCA-20-17 S/W Lab – II Based on MCA-20-12 5 3 100 40 100 40
Total 30   575 230 125 700 280
Second Semester
MCA-20-21 Web Technologies 4 3 75 30 25 100 40
MCA-20-22 Linux and Shell Programming 4 3 75 30 25 100 40
MCA-20-23 Advanced Data Base Systems 4 3 75 30 25 100 40
MCA-20-24 Elective-I 4 3 75 30 25 100 40
MCA-20-25 Elective-II 4 3 75 30 25 100 40
MCA-20-26 S/W Lab – III Based on MCA-20-21 and MCA-20-23 5 3 100 40 100 40
MCA-20-27 S/W Lab – IV Based on MCA-20-22 5 3 100 40 100 40
Total 30   575 230 125 700 280
Elective – I
MCA-20-24 (i) Principles of Programming Languages 4 3 75 30 25 100 40
MCA-20-24(ii) High Performance Networks 4 3 75 30 25 100 40
MCA-20-24(iii) Compiler Design 4 3 75 30 25 100 40
Elective – II
MCA-20-25 (i) Theory of Computation 4 3 75 30 25 100 40
MCA-20-25 (ii) Design and Analysis of Algorithms 4 3 75 30 25 100 40
MCA-20-25(iii) Security in Computing 4 3 75 30 25 100 40

MCA-20-11: Programming in JAVA

Type: Compulsory

Contact Hours: 4 hours/week

Examination Duration: 3 Hours

Mode: Lecture

External Maximum Marks: 75

External Pass Marks: 30(i.e. 40%)

Internal Maximum Marks: 25

Total Maximum Marks: 100

Total Pass Marks: 40(i.e. 40%)

Instructions to paper setter for End semester exam:

Total number of questions shall be nine.  Question number one will be compulsory and will be consisting of short/objective type questions from complete syllabus. In addition to compulsory first question there shall be four units in the question paper each consisting of two questions. Student will attempt one question from each unit in addition to compulsory question. All questions will carry equal marks.

Course Objectives: The course aims is to equip the students with JAVA programming language concepts with object-oriented programming principles. In this course student will be able to learn the basic syntax and semantics of the Java language and programming environment; build robust applications using Java’s object-oriented features; implement the interface and inheritance; understand exceptional handling and multi-threading concepts along with Applets, AWT and Event Handling.

Course Outcomes (COs) At the end of this course, the student will be able to:
MCA-20-11.1 learn the basic features of Java;
MCA-20-11.2 develop program using different concepts of OOPs;
MCA-20-11.3 develop programming using Java I/O and Applet Programming;
MCA-20-11.4 design and Implement Graphics programming using AWT and Layouts.

Unit – I

Java History: Java features, How Java differs from C++, Java Program Structure, Java Tokens, , Java virtual machine, Constants, variables and data types, operators & expressions, control structures, arrays, class & object, garbage collection, finalize() method, Inheritance, method overriding, Abstract class,  Multiple inheritance, Interfaces, extending Interfaces, Accessing Interface variables.

UNIT – II

Packages, Exception Handling & Multithreading: API Packages, Creating packages, Accessing a package, Adding a class to a package, use of super and final keywords, Wrapper classes, Exception types, uncaught exceptions, multiple catch clauses, nested try statements, built-in exceptions, creating your own exceptions, Multithreading; Java thread model, thread priorities, threads synchronization, thread suspending, resuming and stopping threads.

UNIT – III

I/O Streams & Applet: Console I/O – reading console input, writing console output, Files I/O-Byte Streams, Character Streams, Collection of inbuilt Interfaces & Classes, Applet programming, Applet life Cycle, creating executable Applet, Applet Tag, Running an applet, passing parameters to applet, Graphics programming, GUI Concepts in Java, managing Input/Output in Applet.

UNIT – IV

Event Handling: AWT Classes, AWT Button, AWT Label, AWT TextField, AWT TextArea, AWT Checkbox, Event Listeners, Java ActionListener, Java MouseListener, MouseMotionListener, Adapter Classes as Helper Classes in Event Handling. Layout managers- Grid Layout, Flow Layout, Card Layout, Border Layout, Menus.

Text Books:

1. E. Balaguruswamy, Programming with JAVA- A Primer, Tata Mc-Graw Hill publication.

2. Patrick Naughton, Herbert, Schild, The Complete reference Java 2, Tata Mc-Graw Hill.

Reference Books:

1. Patrick Nieaneyer and Joshna Peck, Exploring Java, O. Reilley.

2. Hareliy Hahn, Teacher the Internets, P.H.I.

3. Barry Boone, William Stanck, Java 2 exam Guide, Tata Mc-Graw Hill.

MCA-20-12: Data Structures using C++

Type: Compulsory

Contact Hours: 4 hours/week

Examination Duration: 3 Hours

Mode: Lecture

External Maximum Marks: 75

External Pass Marks: 30(i.e. 40%)

Internal Maximum Marks: 25

Total Maximum Marks: 100

Total Pass Marks: 40(i.e. 40%)

Instructions to paper setter for End semester exam:

Total number of questions shall be nine.  Question number one will be compulsory and will be consisting of short/objective type questions from complete syllabus. In addition to compulsory first question there shall be four units in the question paper each consisting of two questions. Student will attempt one question from each unit in addition to compulsory question. All questions will carry equal marks.

Course Objectives: The objective of this paper is to make the students familiar with the commonly used data structures and understand their applications in real life problems.
Course Outcomes (COs) At the end of this course, the student will be able to:
MCA-20-12.1 understand and apply the array data structure along with various operations on it;
MCA-20-12.2 understand and apply the concepts of linked list, stacks and queue data structures;
MCA-20-12.3 understand and apply the tree data structure in various fields;
MCA-20-12.4 design and analyze the algorithms for graph, sorting, searching, and hashing.

Unit – I

Introduction to Data Structures: Classification of Data Structures, Complexity of Algorithms, Abstract Data Types, Arrays, Representation of Arrays in Memory, Operations on Array, Strings and its Representation in Memory, Operations on Strings, Pointers, Sparse Matrices.

Sorting: Bubble Sort, Selection Sort, and Insertion Sort. Searching: Linear Searching, Binary Searching.Implementation of Arrays, String, Sorting and Searching in C++.

Unit – II

Linked Lists: Introduction, Types and Operations (Insertion, Deletion, Traversal, Searching, Sorting), Applications, Dynamic Memory Management, Polynomial Representation and Addition, Implementation of Linked Representations in C++.

Stacks & Queues: Representation of Stacks, Stack Operations, Applications, Recursion, Queues, Operations on Queues, Circular Queues, Dequeue, Priority Queues, Applications, Implementation of Stacks and Queues in C++.

Unit – III

Trees: Definition and Basic Terminologies, Representation of Trees, Binary Trees, Types of Tree, Representation of Binary Trees, Binary Tree Traversals, Threaded Binary Trees, Binary Search Trees and Operations, AVL Trees, Heap, Heap-Sort, M-Way Search Trees, B-Trees, B+ Trees, Applications, Implementation of trees in C++.

Unit – IV

Graphs: Definitions and Basic Terminologies, Representation of Graphs, Graph Traversals, Operations on Graphs, Shortest Path Problem (Warshall’s Algorithm and Dijkstra’s Algorithm), Minimum Spanning Tree (Prim’s and Kruskal’s Algorithm), Applications, Implementation of Graphs using C++.

Sorting and Searching: Recursive Binary Search, Types of Sorting, Implementation of Different Sorting Techniques in C++: Merge Sort, Radix Sort, Counting Sort, Bucket Sort.

Hashing: Hash functions, Collision Resolution, Implementation using Linear and Quadratic Probing, Chaining using C++.

Text Books:

1.     G.A.V Pai, Data Structures and Algorithms, Tata McGraw-Hill.

2.     Drozdek, Data Structure and Algorithms in C++, Cengage Learning.

Reference Books:

1.  Seymour Lipschutz, Data Structures, Tata McGraw-Hill, Schaum’s Outlines, New Delhi.

2. Weiss, Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C++, Pearson Education.

3. Goodrich, Data Structures & Algorithms in C++, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.

4.  S. Sahni, Data structures, Algorithms, and Applications in C++, University Press (India) Pvt. Ltd.

5. Walter Savitch, Problem solving with C++, Pearson education.

6. John R. Hubbard, Data Structures with C++, Tata McGraw-Hill, Schaum’s Outlines, New Delhi.

 

MCA-20-13: Operating Systems

Type: Compulsory

Contact Hours: 4 hours/week

Examination Duration: 3 Hours

Mode: Lecture

External Maximum Marks: 75

External Pass Marks: 30(i.e. 40%)

Internal Maximum Marks: 25

Total Maximum Marks: 100

Total Pass Marks: 40(i.e. 40%)

Instructions to paper setter for End semester examination:

Total number of questions shall be nine.  Question number one will be compulsory and will be consisting of short/objective type questions from complete syllabus. In addition to compulsory first question, there shall be four units in the question paper each consisting of two questions. Student will attempt one question from each unit in addition to compulsory question. All questions will carry equal marks.

Course Objectives: The objective of this course is to get the students familiar with different functions performed by operating systems.
Course Outcomes (COs) At the end of this course, the student will be able to:
MCA-20-13.1 learn the concept of Operating Systems, processes and the CPU scheduling;
MCA-20-13.2 understand the concept of concurrent processes and deadlocks in operating systems;
MCA-20-13.3 understand the file, memory and device management in operating systems.
MCA-20-13.4 appreciate the need of protection & security along with distributed operating systems.

Unit – I

Introductory Concepts: Operating system functions, structure, types viz. Batch processing systems, multi-programming systems, Time-sharing systems, desktop systems, multi-processor systems, distributed systems, clustered systems, real-time systems, handheld systems, open-source operating systems.

Operating System Structures: System Components, Operating system services, system calls, system programs.

CPU Scheduling:  Process concepts, process operations, inter-process communication, scheduling criteria, scheduling algorithms, Comparative study of scheduling algorithms, Multiple processor scheduling.

Unit – II

Concurrent Processes: Critical section problem, Semaphores, Classical process co-ordination problems and their solutions, monitors.

Deadlocks: Deadlock characterization, Deadlock handling, Deadlock prevention and avoidance, Deadlock detection and recovery.

Unit – III

Memory Management: Swapping, Paging, Segmentation, Virtual memory concepts: Demand Paging, Page replacement Algorithms, Thrashing.

Storage Management: File concepts, File access methods, Directory Structure, File-system mounting, File sharing, Protection, File system structure and implementation, Directory implementation, File allocation methods, Recovery. Disk scheduling criteria and algorithms.

Unit – IV

Protection & Security: Goals of protection, domains of protection, access matrix. Security: Security problem, threats, security tools, classification.

Distributed Systems: Types of network-based OS, Network structure and topologies, Communication structure & Protocol, design issues. Distributed File-system: Remote file access, File replication. Distributed synchronization: Mutual exclusion, Concurrency control, deadlock handling.

Text Books:

1.   Silberschatz A., Galvin P. B., Gagne G., Operating System Concepts, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.

2.   Chauhan Naresh, Principles of Operating Systems, Oxford University Press.

3.   Tanenbaum A.S., Operating System- Design and Implementation, PHI Learning.

Reference Books:

1.   Deitel H.M., Operating Systems, Pearson Education.

2.   Stallings William, Operating System, PHI Learning.

3.   Godbole A.S., Operating Systems, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi.

 

 

MCA-20-14  Data Communication and Computer Networks

Type: Compulsory

Contact Hours: 4 hours/week

Examination Duration: 3 Hours

Mode: Lecture

External Maximum Marks: 75

External Pass Marks: 30(i.e. 40%)

Internal Maximum Marks: 25

Total Maximum Marks: 100

Total Pass Marks: 40(i.e. 40%)

Instructions to paper setter for End semester examination:

Total number of questions shall be nine.  Question number one will be compulsory and will be consisting of short/objective type questions from complete syllabus. In addition to compulsory first question there shall be four units in the question paper each consisting of two questions. Student will attempt one question from each unit in addition to compulsory question. All questions will carry equal marks.

Course Objectives: Provide an in-depth coverage of various concepts, components, and technologies of Computer Networks and Data Communication. Provide the architectural overview of the Internet. Expose the  students to the current trends in wired and wireless communication technologies and real-world networking scenario
Course Outcomes(COs) At the end of this course, the student will be able to:
MCA-20-14.1 characterize various types of computer networks and standards along with an insight into the principles of networking by using protocol layering of the Internet and the TCP/IP protocol suite;
MCA-20-14.2 comprehend the notion of data communication and its related functional components and aspects;
MCA-20-14.3 understand design issues related to Local area Networks and get acquainted with the prevailing wired and wireless LAN  technology standards;
MCA-20-14.4 get versed with the routing, addressing and congestion control issues in Networks and the Internet architecture.

Unit – I

Network Characterization: Goals and Applications; Categorization according to Size,  Purpose, Design issues & Transmission Technologies; Network Architecture and Service Models; Design issues for the Layers; OSI and TCP/IP Reference Models; Functions of  layers and protocols of TCP/IP; Comparison of  OSI & TCP/IP ; Data Transmission using TCP/IP.

Networking Models & Applications: Centralized, Decentralized, and Distributed; Client-Server and Peer-to-Peer; File sharing & Web- based; Content Distribution Networks.

Introduction to Example Networks: The Internet and its Conceptual View ; Accessing The Internet; Connection-Oriented Networks: X.25, Frame Relay and ATM.

Unit – II

Data Communication Concepts & Components:  Digital and Analog Data and Signals, Asynchronous and Synchronous transmission; bit rate, baud, bandwidth & Channel Capacity; Nyquist Bit Rate, Shannon Capacity; Network Performance Parameters; Transmission Impairment.

Connecting Devices & Transmission Media: Network Interface Cards, Connectors, Hubs, Transceivers & Media Connectors; Link-Layer Switches, Bridge, Routers, Gateways, Virtual LANs; Guided Transmission Media; Wireless transmission; Satellite communication.

Data Encoding & Modulation Techniques:  NRZ, NRZ-I, Manchester and Differential Manchester encoding; 4B/5B ; Pulse Code Modulation & Delta Modulation; Digital to Analog encoding.

Switching and Bandwidth Utilization:  Methods of Switching; Virtual Circuit & Datagram Networks; Multiplexing; Spread Spectrum.

Wired Networks and The Local Loop: Telephone Networks; Modems and Modulation Techniques; Broadband and ADSL; Internet over Cable; ADSL Versus Cable; Hybrid Fiber-Coaxial Network; Fiber-to-the-Home Broadband.

Unit – III

Data Link Layer: Communication at the Data Link Layer; Nodes and Links; Link Layer Addressing; Examples of Data Link layer protocols.

Design Issues: Framing techniques: Byte Oriented and Bit Oriented Protocols;   Error Control: Error Detection and Correction; Sliding Window Flow Control Protocols.

Media Access Control: Aloha, CSMA, CSMA/CD, CSMA/CA; Collision free protocols with Controlled Access; Limited Contention Protocols; Channelization: FDMA, TDMA, CDMA; Wavelength Division Multiple access for Fiber-Optic Data Communication.

IEEE LAN standards: Ethernet (Physical specifications, Encoding, Frame Format & MAC protocol); Binary Exponential Backoff algorithm; Token Ring and FDDI.

Introduction to Wireless Networks: IEEE 802.11 Wireless LAN; Wi-Max; Bluetooth and other wireless PAN technologies & their applications; Cellular Networks: Generations; GSM & CDMA Technologies.

Unit – IV

Transport layer: Addressing, Services and Protocols; TCP and UDP services & header formats.

Network Layer  : Services,   Routing Algorithms: Shortest path Routing, Flooding , Distance Vector Routing, Link State Routing, Hierarchical Routing, Multi Cast Routing, Routing for Mobile hosts.

Network layer in TCP/IP:  Basic characteristics of IP protocol; addressing and header format of IPv4; IPv6: Major goals& features.

Congestion Control  & Quality of Service:  General Principals; Congestion control in Virtual – Circuit Subnets; Congestion Control in Datagram Subnets: Choke packets, Load Shedding; Random Early Detection, Jitter Control; Over provisioning, Buffering, Traffic Shaping, Leaky bucket, token bucket, Resource Reservation, Admission Control, Packet Scheduling.

Text Books:

1.     Andrew S. Tanenbaum, Computer Networks, PHI.

2.     Behrouz A Forouzan, Data   Communications   and   Networking, Mc-Graw Hill Education.

Reference Books:

1.  Michael A. Gallo, William M. Hancock, Computer Communications and Networking Technologies,         CENGAGE learning.

2.   William Stallings, Data and Computer Communications, PHI.

 

 

MCA-20-15: Object-Oriented Analysis and Design Using UML

Type: Compulsory

Contact Hours: 4 hours/week

Examination Duration: 3 Hours

Mode: Lecture

External Maximum Marks: 75

External Pass Marks: 30(i.e. 40%)

Internal Maximum Marks: 25

Total Maximum Marks: 100

Total Pass Marks: 40(i.e. 40%)

Instructions to paper setter for End semester examination:

Total number of questions shall be nine.  Question number one will be compulsory and will be consisting of short/objective type questions from complete syllabus. In addition to compulsory first question there shall be four units in the question paper each consisting of two questions. Student will attempt one question from each unit in addition to compulsory question. All questions will carry equal marks.

Course Objectives: To understand the concepts of UML and its use for class modeling, state modeling, use case modeling, interaction modeling, activity modeling etc. and to analyse & design software systems using object-oriented approach.
Course Outcomes (COs) At the end of this course, the student will be able to:
MCA-20-15.1 understand basics of  modeling and fundamentals of UML such as things, relationships, diagrams, extensibility mechanisms and views;
MCA-20-15.2 to practically apply knowledge of class modeling and state modeling using object-oriented analysis and design methods with a clear emphasis on UML;
MCA-20-15.3 to practically apply knowledge of use case modeling, interaction modeling and activity modelling using UML;
MCA-20-15.4 have a working ability and grasping attitude to analyse and design software systems based on object-oriented thinking using UML.

Unit – I

Modeling as a Design Technique: Principles of modeling, abstraction, encapsulation, modularity, hierarchy, typing, concurrency, persistence of objects, purpose of modelling;

UML: Principles of modeling, UML things–structural, behavioral, grouping, annotational relationships in UML–dependency, association, generalization, realization; Overview of UML diagrams, Mechanisms in the UML– specifications, adornments, common divisions, extensibility mechanisms – stereotypes, tagged values, constraints,  UML profiles, UML views.

Unit – II

Class Modeling: Object & Class, Links & Associations, Generalization & Inheritance, Association Ends-scope, visibility, Multiplicity, Rolenames, Ordering, bags & sequences, Qualified association, Aggregation, association attributes & association classes, propagation of operations, Abstract class, Metadata, reification, Constraints, derived data, packages, elements of class diagrams, constructing class diagrams.

State Modeling: Events, States, Transitions & Conditions, Activity Effects, Do-Activities, Entry & Exit Activities, Completion Transitions, Sending Signal, Elements of State diagrams, Nested state diagrams, signal generalization, concurrency, constructing state diagrams.

Unit – III

Use Case modeling: Actors, Use Cases, relationships – between actors, between use cases and between actor and use case, elements of use case diagram, constructing use case diagrams.

Interaction Modeling: Elements of sequence diagram and communication diagram, constructing sequence diagram and communication diagram;

Activity Modeling: Elements of activity diagram, constructing activity diagram.

Unit – IV

System Analysis & design: System development stages, system conception, analysis, domain class model, domain state model, iterating the analysis.

Application interaction model, application class model, application state model, adding operations

System Design: estimating performance, make are use plan, organize the system into subsystem, identifying concurrency, allocating subsystems to processors and tasks, management of data stores, handling global resources, choosing software control strategies, handling boundary conditions, setting trade-off priorities, selecting an architect style.

Class Design: bridging gap, realize use cases with operations, designing algorithms, design optimization, adjustment of inheritance, organize classes & associations.

Text Books:

1.     Grady Booch, James Rumbaugh, Ivar Jacobson, The Unified Modeling Language User Guide,            Pearson education.

2.       M. Blaha, J. Rumbaugh, Object-Oriented Modeling and Design with UML, Pearson Education.

Reference Books:

1.  J.Rumbaugh, M.Blaha, W.Premerlani, F.Eddy, W.Lorensen, Object-Oriented Modeling and Design, Prentice Hall of India.

2.    Satzinger, Jackson, Burd, Object-Oriented Analysis & Design with the Unified Process, Thomson.

3.    Grady Booch, Object Oriented Analysis & Design, Pearson Education.

 

 

 


MCA-20-21: Web Technologies

Type: Compulsory

Contact Hours: 4 hours/week

Examination Duration: 3 Hours

Mode: Lecture

External Maximum Marks: 75

External Pass Marks: 30(i.e. 40%)

Internal Maximum Marks: 25

Total Maximum Marks: 100

Total Pass Marks: 40(i.e. 40%)

Instructions to paper setter for End semester examination:

Total number of questions shall be nine.  Question number one will be compulsory and will be consisting of short/objective type questions from complete syllabus. In addition to compulsory first question there shall be four units in the question paper each consisting of two questions. Student will attempt one question from each unit in addition to compulsory question. All questions will carry equal marks.

Course Objectives: The objective of this course is to provide fundamentals concepts of Web Services, JavaScript and lays foundations for the advanced studies in the area of web services.
Course Outcomes (COs) At the end of this course, the student will be able to:
MCA-20-21.1 design web pages using HTML5 and CSS;
MCA-20-21.2 understand objects and data validation in JavaScript;
MCA-20-21.3 build Dynamic web site using server side PHP Programming and Database connectivity;
MCA-20-21.4 create web applications with Ajax.
Unit – I

Introduction: Web browsers and its functions, web optimizations; Static page design; designing static web pages with HTML5.0-HTML basic, multimedia, Graphics, Form tags, CSS 2.0 concept and its properties & CSS 3.0 properties i.e. borders, backgrounds, fonts, text effects, Buffering, Weblog, Web Cache Poisoning.

Unit – II

JavaScript: Document Object Model (DOM), Obtaining user inputs, memory concepts, Operators, Control Structures, Looping constructs, break, continue statements, Programmer defined functions, Scoping rules, Recursion and iteration, Array declaration and allocation, passing arrays to function, Objects: String, Date, Boolean, Window, document; using cookies, form validation in Java Script, Handling Events Using JavaScript.

Unit – III

PHP: Installing and Configuring MySQL and PHP, Basic Security Guidelines, Variables, Data Types, Operators and Expressions, Constants, Flow Control Functions; Switching Flow, Loops, Code Blocks and Browser Output, Objects, Strings Processing, Form processing, Connecting to database, cookies, Session, dynamic contents.

Unit – IV

Introduction to AJAX: Exploring different web technologies, Creating a simple AJAX application, Interacting with the Web Server Using the XMLHttpRequest Object, Create an XMLHttpRequest Object, Interact with the Web Server. Differentiating AJAX and Non-AJAX application.

Working with PHP and AJAX: Introduction, Process Client Requests, Accessing Files Using PHP,

Implementing Security and Accessibility in AJAX applications: Introduction, Secure AJAX Applications, Accessible Rich Internet Applications.

Text Books:

1.     Deitel H.M., Deitel P.J., Internet & World Wide Web: How to program, Pearson Education.

2.     Kogent Learning, Web Technologies: HTML, JavaScript, PHP, Java, JSP, XML, AJAX – Black Book, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.

Reference Books:

1.     Boronczyk, Naramore, Beginning PHP, Apache, MySQL Web Development, Wiley India Pvt.Ltd.

2.     Thomas Powell, Ajax: The Complete Reference Book.

 

MCA-20-22: Linux and Shell Programming

Type: Compulsory

Contact Hours: 4 hours/week

Examination Duration: 3 Hours

Mode: Lecture

External Maximum Marks: 75

External Pass Marks: 30(i.e. 40%)

Internal Maximum Marks: 25

Total Maximum Marks: 100

Total Pass Marks: 40(i.e. 40%)

Instructions to paper setter for End semester examination:

Total number of questions shall be nine.  Question number one will be compulsory and will be consisting of short/objective type questions from complete syllabus. In addition to compulsory first question there shall be four units in the question paper each consisting of two questions. Student will attempt one question from each unit in addition to compulsory question. All questions will carry equal marks.

Course Objectives: The objectives of this course are to provide the in-depth coverage of various concepts of Linux. Linux administration is an essential course for the students.
Course Outcomes (COs) At the end of this course, the student will be able to:
MCA-20-22.1 understand the concepts and commands of Linux;
MCA-20-22.2 understand the file management and process manipulation in Linux;
MCA-20-22.3 understand the C environment under Linux and do the system administration and communication in Linux;
MCA-20-22.4 develop shell programs in Linux.

Unit – I

Introduction: History, Basic features, architecture, distributions. Installing Linux, Logging in / Logging out.

File System: Introduction to files, Organization, Assessing File systems, Structure – boot block, super block, inode block, data block.

Basic and Advanced Commands: Directory oriented commands, File oriented commands, File access permissions: chmod, umask, chgrp, groups. General purpose commands.

Unit – II

File management and Compression: Computer devices, Disk related commands: dd, du, df, dfspace, fdisk, compressing and uncompressing files.

Manipulating Processes and Signals:Basics, process states and transitions, zombie and orphan processes, process oriented commands. Handling foreground and background jobs. Process scheduling using cron, crontab, at, batch. Changing priority. Signal generation and Handling.

System calls:  Files related system calls for opening, creating, reading,  writing, relocating file descriptors, closing, duplicating file descriptors, linking, unlinking, accessing file status information, checking permissions, changing ownership, groups and permissions of files. Process related system calls: exec, fork, wait, exit.

Unit – III

System Administration: Booting and shutting down process. Creating, mounting and unmounting file systems. Managing User accounts: creating, modifying & deleting user accounts and groups.

Networking Tools: Communication oriented commands. ping, nslookup, telnet, arp, netstat, route, ftp, trivial file transfer protocol, finger, rlogin.

C language compiler, the make command and makefiles, general debugging techniques, debugging with gdb.

 

Unit – IV

Pipes and filters: Connecting processes with pipes, redirecting input and output. Filters: sort, grep, egrep, fgrep, uniq, more, pr, cut, paste, tr.

Shell Programming: Shell meaning & types; Introduction to shell scripting, shell variables, exporting shell variables, Escape mechanisms, Shell meta characters, read command, conditional statements, looping and case statements, expr statement, command line arguments, sleep and basename commands, Bourne Shell Commands, string handling, arrays, shell functions, shell programs to automate system tasks.

Text Books:

1. Harwani B.M., Unix and Shell Programming, Oxford University Press.

2. Goerzen John, Linux Programming Bible, IDG Books, New Delhi.

Reference Books:

1. Matthew Neil, Stones Richard, Beginning Linux Programming, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.

2. Christopher Negus, Linux Bible, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.

3. Das Sumitabha, You UNIX – The Ultimate Guide, Tata McGraw Hill

4. Richard Peterson, Linux – The Complete Reference, Tata McGraw Hill

MCA-20-23: Advanced Data Base Systems

Type: Compulsory

Contact Hours: 4 hours/week

Examination Duration: 3 Hours

Mode: Lecture

External Maximum Marks: 75

External Pass Marks: 30(i.e. 40%)

Internal Maximum Marks: 25

Total Maximum Marks: 100

Total Pass Marks: 40(i.e. 40%)

Instructions to paper setter for End semester examination:

Total number of questions shall be nine.  Question number one will be compulsory and will be consisting of short/objective type questions from complete syllabus. In addition to compulsory first question there shall be four units in the question paper each consisting of two questions. Student will attempt one question from each unit in addition to compulsory question. All questions will carry equal marks.

Course Objectives: The aim of this course is to provide an in-depth exposure of SQL and PL/SQL to implement database management system in an organization. The course covers the variety of databases to meet real life problem scenario.
Course Outcomes (COs) At the end of this course, the student will be able to:
MCA-20-23.1 understand database architecture, designing of databases using ER and EER model;
MCA-20-23.2 to write complex queries in SQL and can design PL/SQL blocks for database implementation;
MCA-20-23.3 learn query optimization and concurrency control techniques;
MCA-20-23.4 gain knowledge of variety of databases to meet real life problem scenario.

UNIT – I

Database Systems Concepts and Architecture: Schema and Instances, DBMS architecture and Data Independence, Database languages and Interfaces, DBMS Functions and Component Modules. Entity Relationship Model: Entity Types, Entity Sets, Attributes & keys, Relationships Types & Instances, Roles and Structural Constraints, E-R Diagrams, Design of an E-R Database Schema.

The Enhanced Entity-Relationship (EER) Model: Subclasses, Super classes, Inheritance, Specialization and Generalization.

UNIT – II

SQL: Data Definition and Data Types, DDL, DML, and DCL, Views & Queries in SQL, Specifying Constraints & Indexes in SQL. PL/SQL: Architecture of PL/SQL, Basic Elements of PL/SQL, PL/SQL Transactions, Cursors and Triggers.

Relational Database Design: Functional Dependencies, Decomposition, Normal Forms Based on Primary Keys- (1NF, 2NF, 3NF, BCNF), Multi-valued Dependencies, 4 NF, Join dependencies, 5 NF, Domain Key Normal Form.

UNIT – III

Query Processing and Optimization, Transaction Processing: Introduction to Transaction Processing, Transaction and System Concepts, Desirable Properties of Transactions, Concurrency Control Techniques: Two-Phase Locking Techniques, Timestamp Ordering, Serializability. Database Backup and Recovery: Recovery facilities, Recovery Techniques.

 

UNIT – IV

Databases for Advance Applications: Architecture for Parallel Database and Distributed Database, Active Database Concept and Triggers, Temporal Databases Concepts, Spatial and Multimedia Databases, Deductive Databases, Geographical Information System, Mobile Databases, Web Databases, XML Schema, Object- Based Databases, OLTP Vs OLAP.

Text Books:

1.     Elmasri & Navathe: Fundamentals of Database systems, Pearson Education.

2.     Ivan Bayross: SQL, PL/SQL- The Program Language of ORACLE, BPB Publication.

3.     Alexis Leon & Mathews Leon: Database Management System, Leon Vikas Publication.

Reference Books:

1.     Korth&Silberschatz: Database System Concept, McGraw Hill International Edition.

2.     Raghu Ramakrishnan& Johannes Gehrke: Database Management Systems, Mcgraw Hill.

3.     Peter Rob, Carlos Colonel: Database system Design, Implementation, and Measurement, Cengage           Learning.

4.     Abbey, Abramson & Corey: Oracle 8i-A Beginner’s Guide, Tata McGraw Hill.

 

 

 

MCA-20-24(i): Principles of Programming Languages

Type: Elective

Contact Hours: 4 hours/week

Examination Duration: 3 Hours

Mode: Lecture

External Maximum Marks: 75

External Pass Marks: 30(i.e. 40%)

Internal Maximum Marks: 25

Total Maximum Marks: 100

Total Pass Marks: 40(i.e. 40%)

Instructions to paper setter for End semester exam:

Total number of questions shall be nine.  Question number one will be compulsory and will be consisting of short/objective type questions from complete syllabus. In addition to compulsory first question there shall be four units in the question paper each consisting of two questions. Student will attempt one question from each unit in addition to compulsory question. All questions will carry equal marks.

Course Objectives: The objective of this paper is to make the students familiar with different elements of programming languages such as data types/operators/statements/control constructs and their implementation with the understanding that it will help them in becoming a better programmer.
Course Outcomes (COs) At the end of this course, the student will be able to:
MCA-20-24(i).1 understand the programming language hierarchy and basics of compilation;
MCA-20-24(i).2 understand the different types of grammar;
MCA-20-24(i).3 understand the features of object oriented language and different methods of sequence control;
MCA-20-24(i).4 understand the implementation of different type of functions.

Unit – I

Preliminaries: History, Impact of Programming Paradigms, Role of Programming Languages, Good Language, Effects of Programming Environment, Translators and virtual architectures, Binding and Binding time, Language Syntax, Analysis of Program, Synthesis of Object program, Formal translation models: BNF Grammars, General parsing, Language translation, Recursive descent parsing.

Unit – II

Formal languages and automata: The Chomsky hierarchy of formal languages, regular grammars, Regular expressions, Finite State Automata, Context-free grammars, Pushdown automata, Ambiguous grammars.

Language Semantics: Attribute grammars, Denotational semantics, Program verification and validation, Data objects, variables, constants, data types, declaration, type checking, type casting, type promotion, Enumerators, Composite data types.

Unit – III

Object Orientated concepts: Structured data types, Abstract data types, Information hiding, Subprogram concepts, Good program design, Type definitions, Type equivalence, Inheritance, Derived classes, Abstract classes, Polymorphism, Inheritance and software reuse.

Sequence control: Implicit and explicit sequence control, Sequence control within arithmetic expressions, sequence control between statements, sequencing with non-arithmetic expressions, Subprogram Sequence control.

Unit – IV

Miscellaneous topics: Parameter passing techniques, Static & Dynamic Scoping, Storage of variables, Static storage, Heap Storage management, Distributed Processing, Exceptions and Exception handlers, Co-routines, Scheduled subprograms, Parallel programming, Processor design, Hardware and Software architectures, Network Programming, Evolution of scripting languages, Applets, XML.

Text Books:

1.     Pratt T.W., Zelkowitz M.V., Gopal T.V., Programming Languages Design and Implementation,                  Pearson Education.

2.     Sebesta W. Robert, Concepts of Programming Languages, Pearson Education.

Reference Books:

1.    Appleby Doris &VandeKopple J. Julius, Programming Languages-Paradigm and practice, Tata                 McGraw Hill.

2.    Sethi Ravi, Programming Languages: Concepts & Constructs, Pearson Education.

3.    Scott M., Programming Language Pragmatics, Elsevier India.

 

 

 

MCA-20-24 (ii) :High Performance Networks

Type: Elective

Contact Hours: 4 hours/week

Examination Duration: 3 Hours

Mode: Lecture

External Maximum Marks: 75

External Pass Marks: 30(i.e. 40%)

Internal Maximum Marks: 25

Total Maximum Marks: 100

Total Pass Marks: 40(i.e. 40%)

Instructions to paper setter for End semester examination:

Total number of questions shall be nine.  Question number one will be compulsory and will be consisting of short/objective type questions from complete syllabus. In addition to compulsory first question there shall be four units in the question paper each consisting of two questions. Student will attempt one question from each unit in addition to compulsory question. All questions will carry equal marks.

Course Objectives: Highlight and Characterize the constituent features of the Internet and other communication technologies for high speed networking and demanding applications.  Apprise the students with the prevalent developments in High Performance Network technologies.
Course Outcomes: At the end of this course, the student will be able to:
MCA-20-24(ii).1 have an insight into the modern wired and wireless  technologies  and architectures for high speed networks from a design and  performance perspective;
MCA-20-24(ii).2 understand  addressing  and analyze performance issues related to the Internet;
MCA-20-24(ii).3 figure out  the techniques involved to support real-time traffic and congestion control in the Internet along with an exposure to the Internet and Adhoc Network routing protocols;
MCA-20-24(ii).4 analyze the architectural issues of the application level services of the Internet and will be able to do Client-server programming for applications.

Unit – I

TCP/IP Networks: Standards and Administration; Internet Structure; ISPs and Backbone Networks;  Internet Architecture; Key Requirements for Efficiency of Networks: Scalable Connectivity, Cost-Effective Resource Sharing, Support for Services, Manageability; Performance Parameters for High-Speed Networks; Application Performance Needs.

Network Technologies for High-Speed Networks: Ethernet and its High speed versions, FDDI, Frame Relay Networks; SONET; DWDM; ATM: Design goals, Architecture and Logical Connection, ATM Cells, connection establishment and release, Switching, ATM Layers.

Wireless Networks: 802.11 Wireless LANs/Wi-Fi: Architecture, MAC Protocol, Frame, Mobility in the same IP subnet; LAN Interoperability; 802.16 Wireless MAN/Wi-Max:  Services, Layers; Cellular Internet Access: Architecture, Cellular Standards and Technologies, Managing Mobility in Cellular Networks.

Unit – II

Link Layer addressing & protocols: Types of Addresses and Address Resolution Protocol (ARP); HDLC; PPP.

Network Layer Performance and  Protocols in TCP/IP : Delay, Throughput, Packet Loss, Congestion Control; Internet Protocol (IPv4); Fragmentation; Type of Service;  Classful and Classless addressing; Subnetting&Supernetting; DHCP;  CIDR.

Private Network Interconnection: Virtual Private Network; Network Address Translation (NAT).

Next Generation IP:  IPv6; ICMP; Mobile IP; Address Mapping: Multicasting & IGMP.

Unit – III

TCP/IP Transport Layer and Congestion Control:  Client/Server paradigm; Peer-to-Peer Paradigm;  Port numbers; TCP connection; TCP  flow and congestion control; Congestion –Avoidance Mechanisms: DECbit, Random Early Detection(RED), Source-Based Congestion Avoidance; UDP services and applications; SCTP Services & Features.

Quality of Service in IP Networks: Application Requirements; Data flow characteristics; Integrated Services (RSVP);  Differentiated Services ; Multiprotocol Label Switching; Real-Time Transport Protocol.

Internet Routing Protocols: Unicast Routing Protocols (RIP; OSPF; BGP); Multicast Routing and Protocols (DVMRP, MOSPF, PIM, MBGP).

Mobile Adhoc Networks: Introduction; Table-Driven and On-Demand Routing Protocols.

Unit – IV

Standard Client-Server Protocols and Applications: WWW and HTTP; Web Services; FTP connections; Electronic-Mail architecture & Security; Remote logging using TELNET.

Domain Name System: Name Space, DNS in the Internet, Caching, Resource records, messages.

Client-server programming: Application Programming Interface; Introduction to Sockets; Socket Descriptors; Ports and Connection.

Network Management: Introduction , Management Information Base (MIB); SNMP.

Text Books:

1.  William Stallings, High-Speed Networks and Internets, Performance and Quality of Service”. Pearson Education.

2.  Peterson, L.L. & Davie, B.S.  Computer networks: a systems approach. Morgan Kaufmann.

3.  Jean Walrand and Pravinvariya, High performance Communication networks, Harcourt and Morgan Kauffman

Reference Books:

1.     Behrouz A. Forouzan, Data Communications and Networking, Fourth Edition, McGraw Hill.

2.     B Muthukumaran, Introduction to High Performance Networks, McGraw-Hill

3.     Adrian Farrel, The Internet and Its Protocols: A Comparative Approach,Elsevier Science

4.  Douglas E. Comer, Internetworking with TCP/IP Volume – I, Principles, Protocols, and Architectures, Pearson Education.

5.     Mahbub Hassan, Raj Jain, High Performance TCP/IP Networking, Concepts, Issues, and Solutions, Pearson Education.

6.   James F. Kurose, Keith W. Ross, Computer Networking, A Top-Down Approach Featuring the Internet, Pearson Education.

7.     Andrew S. Tanenbaum, Computer Networks, PHI.

 

 

 

MCA-20-24(iii): Compiler Design

Type: Elective

Contact Hours: 4 hours/week

Examination Duration: 3 Hours

Mode: Lecture

External Maximum Marks: 75

External Pass Marks: 30(i.e. 40%)

Internal Maximum Marks: 25

Total Maximum Marks: 100

Total Pass Marks: 40(i.e. 40%)

Instructions to paper setter for End semester exam:

Total number of questions shall be nine.  Question number one will be compulsory and will be consisting of short/objective type questions from complete syllabus. In addition to compulsory first question there shall be four units in the question paper each consisting of two questions. Student will attempt one question from each unit in addition to compulsory question. All questions will carry equal marks.

Course Objectives: The objective of the course is to provide in-depth coverage of underlying concepts & techniques used in compiler design and to cover major topics in compilation Theory. This course will make students ready for job assignments involving compilers and prepare students to undertake projects on compilers Construction.
Course Outcomes (COs) At the end of this course, the student will be able to:
MCA-20-24(iii).1 understand overall process of compilation;
MCA-20-24(iii).2 understand the process of parsing in compilers;
MCA-20-24(iii).3 analyze semantic analysis, building a symbol table, handle storage management and error-detection in the process of compiler designing;
MCA-20-24(iii).4 design a compiler and understand the concept of code generation and optimization.

Unit – I

Compilers and Translators, Need of Translators, Tools used for compilation, Structure of Compiler, Single-Pass and Multi-Pass Compilers, Bootstrapping, Compiler Construction Tools, Phases of Compilation process, Classification of grammars.

Lexical Analysis: Design, Finite Automata and Regular Expressions, Process of Lexical Analysis, Lexical Analyzer generators, Derivations and parse trees.

Unit – II

Parsing Techniques: Top down Parsing- Predictive Parsers, Left Recursion and its removal, Recursive Descent Parsers, LL Grammars.

Bottom-up parsing:  Shift Reduce Parsing, Operator Precedence Parsing, LR Parsers, LR grammars, Comparison of parsing methods, Parser Generators.

Unit – III

Semantic Analysis: Syntax-Directed Translation Schemes.

Building Symbol Table, Data Structures for symbol table, representing scope information. An overview of Run-time Storage Administration. Error Detection and Recovery: Errors, Lexical-Phase Errors, Syntactic Phase Errors, Semantic Errors.

Unit – IV

Intermediate Source Forms: Postfix Notation, Syntax Trees, Triples & Quadruples.

Code Optimization:  Potential cases of Code Optimization, Optimization of basic blocks, Local and Global optimizations, Code Improving Transformation. Code Generator:  Issues in the design of a code generator.

Text Books:

1. Alfred V Aho, Principles of Compiler Design, Narosa Publishing House.

2. Jean Paul Tremblay and Sorenson, The Theory and Practice of Compiler Writing, McGraw Hill.

Reference Books:

1. Dhamdhere D.M, System programming and operating system, McGraw Hill.

2. Beck L. Leland, System Software, Pearson Education.

3. Aho, Sethi, & Ullman, Compilers Principles, Techniques and Tools, Pearson Education.

4. Fischer, Crafting a compiler in C, Pearson Education.

 

 

 

MCA-20-25(i): Theory of Computation

Type: Elective

Contact Hours: 4 hours/week

Examination Duration: 3 Hours

Mode: Lecture

External Maximum Marks: 75

External Pass Marks: 30(i.e. 40%)

Internal Maximum Marks: 25

Total Maximum Marks: 100

Total Pass Marks: 40(i.e. 40%)

Instructions to paper setter for End semester exam:

Total number of questions shall be nine.  Question number one will be compulsory and will be consisting of short/objective type questions from complete syllabus. In addition to compulsory first question there shall be four units in the question paper each consisting of two questions. Student will attempt one question from each unit in addition to compulsory question. All questions will carry equal marks.

Course Objectives: The objective of this course is to provide the in-depth coverage of theoretical computer science. It provides an insight about design of all types of machines and their applications.
Course Outcomes (COs) At the end of this course, the student will be able to:
MCA-20-25(i).1 design various finite state machines for real life problems;
MCA-20-25(i).2 differentiate between the applications of different kind of machines;
MCA-20-25(i).3 solve the tractable and intractable problems using various approaches;
MCA-20-25(i).4 understand the need and importance of Turing machines and their suitability.

Unit – I

Finite State Machines: Finite Automata, Designing of DFA and NDFA, NFA with E-Transitions, Equivalence of DFA and NFA with proof, Regular Expressions and Regular languages, Laws of Regular Expressions, Kleene’s Theorem 1 and 2, Properties and Limitations of FSM

FSM with Output: Moore and Mealy Machines, Arden’s Theorem with proof, Closure Properties of Regular Sets, Pumping Lemma for Regular Grammers, Minimization of FA.

Unit – II

Formal Grammars: Definition, Construction of Regular & Context Free Grammar, Derivation, Parse Trees, Ambiguity, Removal of Ambiguity, Simplification of Context Free Grammar, CNF and GNF, Closure properties of CFL, Pumping Lemma for CFL.

Pushdown Automaton: Introduction, Types of PDA, Designing of PDA’s, Conversion from PDA to CFG and vice-versa.

Unit – III

Linear Bounded Automata (LBA), Turing Machines (TM), General Model of Computation, TM as Language Acceptors, TM as Computing Partial Functions, Combining TM, Multi-Tape TM, Restricted and Universal TM; TM and Computers.

Recursive and recursively-enumerable languages and Properties, More General Grammars

Unit – IV

Reductions and the Halting Problem, Post’s correspondence problem, Rice’s theorem, Cook’s Theorem, decidability of membership, emptiness and equivalence problems of languages, Decidable languages and problems, Diagonalization method.

Computable Functions: Primitive recursive functions, Godel Numbering, Tractable and Intractable problems, Computable Complexity.

Text Books:

1.     John C. Martin, Introduction to Languages and the Theory of Computation, McGraw Hill.

2.     Peter Linz, An introduction to formal language & automata, Jones & Bartlett publications.

Reference Books:

1.    Hopcroft J. E. & Ullman J. D, Formal languages and their relation to Automata, Pearson Education.

2.    Lewis, H.R. & Papadimitrious, C. H., Elements of the theory of computation. PHI Learning.

3.    Michael Sipser, Introduction to the Theory of Computation, Cengage Learning.

 

 

 

MCA-20-25 (ii): Design and Analysis of Algorithms

Type: Elective

Contact Hours: 4 hours/week

Examination Duration: 3 Hours

Mode: Lecture

External Maximum Marks: 75

External Pass Marks: 30(i.e. 40%)

Internal Maximum Marks: 25

Total Maximum Marks: 100

Total Pass Marks: 40(i.e. 40%)

Instructions to paper setter for End semester exam:

Total number of questions shall be nine.  Question number one will be compulsory and will be consisting of short/objective type questions from complete syllabus. In addition to compulsory first question there shall be four units in the question paper each consisting of two questions. Student will attempt one question from each unit in addition to compulsory question. All questions will carry equal marks.

Course Objectives: The objective of this course is to provide the in-depth coverage of various algorithm design techniques. It focuses on various problems and their solutions using different algorithm design techniques.
Course Outcomes (COs) At the end of this course, the student will be able to:
MCA-20-25(ii).1 understand the complexity of problems and apply the solutions accordingly;
MCA-20-25(ii).2 categorize problems based on their characteristics and practical importance;
MCA-20-25(ii).3 design solutions to problems using various algorithmic techniques;
MCA-20-25(ii).4 classifying and solving problems as P, NP or NP Complete.

Unit – I

Introduction: Algorithms, Role of algorithms in computing, Analysing algorithms, Designing algorithms, Asymptotic notations.

Divide and Conquer: Solving recurrence equations: Back substitution method, Recursion tree method, Masters theorem.

Probabilistic Analysis and Randomized Algorithms: The hiring problem, Indicator random variables, Randomized algorithms, Probabilistic analysis and further uses of indicator random variables

Unit – II

Trees: Red-black trees and Splay trees. Dynamic Programming (DP): Elements of DP, Matrix chain multiplication, Longest common subsequence, optimal binary search trees. Greedy Techniques (GT): Elements of GT, Activity selection problem, Huffman codes, Knapsack Problem.

Unit – III

Graph Algorithms: Topological sort, Strongly connected components, Single source shortest path: Analysis of Dijkstra’s Algorithm, Limitations of Dijkstra’s Algorithm, Negative weight cycle, Bellman-Ford algorithm. All Pairs Shortest Path: Relation of Shortest path and matrix multiplication, Analysis of Floyd Warshall algorithm. Maximum Flow: Flow network, Ford-Fulkerson method.

Strings: Storage of strings, Naive string-matching algorithm, Rabin-Karp algorithm, String matching with finite automata, Knuth-Morris-Pratt algorithm

Unit – IV

Computational Geometry: Line-segment properties, Convex hull, Closest pair of points.

Computational complexity: Notion of Polynomial time algorithms, Complexity classes: P, NP, NP-Hard and NP-Complete, Polynomial time verification, Reducibility, NP-Completeness, Examples of NP-Complete and NP-Hard problems: Traveling Salesman Problem, Knapsack, Bin Packing, Satisfiability, Vertex Cover, Clique, Independent Set.

Text Books:

1.     Cormen, Leiserson, Rivest, Introduction to Algorithms, PHI India.

2.     Neapolitan R., Foundations of Algorithms, Jones and Bartlett Learning.

Reference Books:

1..   Cooper A., Computability Theory, Chapman and Hall/ CRC Press.

2.    A.V.Aho, J.E.Hopcroft, and J.D.Ullman, The Design and Analysis of Computer Algorithms, Pearson Education India

3.    AnanyLevitin: Introduction to the Design and Analysis of Algorithms, Pearson Education.

4.    R.C.T Lee, S.S. Tseng, R.C. Chang, Y.T. Tsai, Introduction to Design and Analysis of Algorithms: A Strategic Approach, Tata McGraw Hill

5.    Steven Skiena, The Algorithm Design Manual, Springer India.

 

 

 

MCA-20-25 (iii): Security in Computing

Type: Elective

Contact Hours: 4 hours/week

Examination Duration: 3 Hours

Mode: Lecture

External Maximum Marks: 75

External Pass Marks: 30(i.e. 40%)

Internal Maximum Marks: 25

Total Maximum Marks: 100

Total Pass Marks: 40(i.e. 40%)

Instructions to paper setter for End semester examination:

Total number of questions shall be nine.  Question number one will be compulsory and will be consisting of short/objective type questions from complete syllabus. In addition to compulsory first question there shall be four units in the question paper each consisting of two questions. Student will attempt one question from each unit in addition to compulsory question. All questions will carry equal marks.

Course Objectives: The objective of this course is to provide the coverage of various security parameters and vulnerabilities. This course enables the students to handle various security issues in real-world.
Course Outcomes (COs) At the end of this course, the student will be able to:
MCA-20-25 (iii).1 learn the concepts of computer security and various cryptographic techniques for securing a system;
MCA-20-25 (iii).2 understand the concepts of database security and various network security controls;
MCA-20-25 (iii).3 get familiar with various Internet security protocols;
MCA-20-25 (iii).4 understand various physical security breaches and Intellectual property rights.

Unit – I

Computer Security Concepts, Threats, Attacks and Assets, Security Functional Requirements, Security

Architecture and Scope of Computer Security, Computer Security Trends and Strategies. Cryptography: Terminology and Background, Substitution Ciphers, Transpositions, Cryptanalysis,

Program Security: Secure Program, Non-malicious Program Error, Viruses and other Malicious Code, Targeted Malicious Code, Control against Program Threats.

Unit – II

Database Security: Database Management System, Relational Databases, Database Access Control, Inference, Security Requirements, Reliability and Integrity, Sensitive Data, Database Encryption.

Network Security: Threats in Network, Network Security Controls, and Firewall- Need for firewall, Characteristics, Types of firewall, Firewall Basing, Intrusion Detection System- Types, Goals of IDS, IDS strengths and Limitations.

Unit – III

Internet Security Protocols and Standards: Secure Socket Layer (SSL) and Transport Layer Security (TLS), IPv4 and IPv6 Security, Kerberos 672, X.509, Public Key Infrastructure.

Linux Security Model, File System Security, Linux Vulnerability, Linux System Hardening, Application

Security. Window Security Architecture, Windows Vulnerability, Windows Security Defense, Browser Defenses.

Unit – IV

Physical Security Threats, Physical Security Prevention and Mitigation Measures, Recovery form Physical

Security Breaches, Security Auditing Architecture, Security Audit Trail, Security Risk assessment, Security Controls or Safeguard, IT Security Plan, Implementation of Controls, Cybercrime and Computer Crime, Intellectual Property, Privacy, Ethical Issues.

Text Books:

1.     Charles. P. Pfleeger & Shari Lawrence Pfleeger, Security in Computing, Pearson Education.

Reference Books:

1.     William Stalling, Lawrie Brown, Computer Security Principles and Practice, Pearson Education.

2.     Atul Kahate, Cryptography and Network Security, Tata McGraw-Hill Education

 

 

 

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